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  2. Thanks, Tink. I guess it was a DOUBLE cinquain, with the second one reversed: 2/4/6/8/2, then 2/8/6/4/2 You're right: just write. :)
  3. Yesterday
  4. Love it! When I haven't been writing and I really want to get back to it even in a small way, I resort to haiku.... at least it is something. I love the Cinquains especially the 2nd one. Statue of St Francis governs in my garden, hummingbirds, bees and butterflies welcome Not exactly as thought provoking as yours but when inspired - write.(even if it is a little poem.) ~~Tink
  5. I hadn't brought this up to date and you couldn't be left out. Yes we have lost a couple permanently but their memory remains as does their poetry. As a matter of fact a couple of others we think have passed also but have been unable to verify. A lot of poets here have come and moved on in one way or another. There are a couple in this series of limericks that I actually don't remember.
  6. Powerful last stanza, image-wise. (Yes, I had to query for Rhondda.)
  7. I am NOT religiously orthodox, but I am just now "getting" how powerful imagery, metaphor, and allegory can be. And I have not written much these past few months. One of my lawn customers has a statue of Mary: all the color gone, flaking, missing hands, face almost worn smooth. Statues of Mary rot in every rock garden that has a rose bush and bird bath. Amen. Statues of Mary are often missing both hands. How can she hold Her Son's body? Amen.
  8. Last week
  9. Oh, Frank AND Victor. I did not know.
  10. Oh, my heavens! I do declare! Where IS my fan? Haha, thanks for the mention. I have been silent a while, and I am honored.
  11. Oh, I like this part SO much: efficiently deshelving works Brave to have no punctuation, too.
  12. Thanks Tony. Folk tales can pick up the darker threads. The editor puts together themed anthologies too - chance for PMO members to have poems in print! best Phil
  13. I have a friend who did some horse-riding in Siberia...but yes, this is a time in Wales
  14. This takes me somewhere. It's rustic, woodsy. I picture a small self-sufficient farm where in the farmhouse, almost a cabin, the imagination is free to roam. It could be situated on the outskirts of a village in a Siberian forest; but no, that would probably be too remote. Most likely the setting is Wales ... Tony
  15. Cool site, Phil. I like the layout, the way the current issue is set up as a player. Of course, I maximized it to full screen to enjoy it. Your entry is right there. The meter matches the subject matter, and I especially like the alliteration in the penultimate and ultimate lines. The poem itself comes across as "earthy," elemental, equinoctial. I read, cautiously, and my suspicions were confirmed when, at the end, the poem turned eerie: "No child plays here." Great work! Tony
  16. Earlier
  17. Very readable setting and narrative. Perhaps Van Gogh was a tangent, took me away from the written word. The title is a definite hook. enjoyed badge
  18. under the stairs, hugging mum's laundry basket - the family scent - their haste in all things airing cupboard, upstairs, next to the boiler - copper womb - lulling mites to sleep not bite the outside toilet, snug and safe - tip-tap rhythms - Rhondda rain on slate the allotment shed, cooling in slow webs - the buzz - so many hungry hours beyond the chapel, woods whisper, nursing fairy tales - and here lying on this pew - the crucifix warming in stained glass light.
  19. Byron's Sonnet is a sonnet form named from George Gordon, Lord Byron's attempts at expanding the rhyme from 2 to 3 rhymes in the octave of the Italian or Petrarchan Sonnet. The elements of Byron's Sonnet are: a quatorzain made up of an octave followed by a sestet. metric, iambic pentameter. rhymed, rhyme scheme abba acca dedede pivot or volta between the octave and sestet. Sonnet to Chillon by Lord Byron Eternal spirit of the chainless mind! Brightest in dungeons, Liberty! thou art, For there thy habitation is the heart, The heart which love of thee alone can bind; And when thy sons to fetters are consigned To fetters, and the damp vault's dayless gloom, Their country conquers with their martyrdom, And Freedom's fame finds wings on every wind. Chillon! thy prison is a holy place, And thy sad floor an altar, for 'twas trod, Until his very steps have left a trace Worn, as if thy cold pavement were a sod, By Bonnivard! - May none those marks efface! For they appeal from tyranny to God.
  20. I have one appearing here... https://threedropspoetry.co.uk/2017/06/11/three-drops-from-a-cauldron-issue-16-june-2017/9/
  21. Thanks Tony. I was unsure of posting the poem - how much the narrative would translate - pleased that meaning was not lost. best Phil
  22. Hi David, I keep coming back to this and find it almost eirry. . i can see the cross armed librarian impatiently waiting for the kids to be picked up,so she can put things in order and close up. Like Tony I've not been inside a library for a long time although I've picked up a grandchild from the library where she went with the pretext of working on a school project with a a friend but in reality as an excuse to just hang out with several. It turned out not much work got accomplished. I hope the kids weren't too disruptive. Too me libraries were always silent vaults and I was afraid I was going make a sound that would echo throughout and angry stares would be directed toward me. Interesting how imagery can bring forth emotions long forgotten. I am sure more will surface as come back again and again. ~~Tink
  23. Haiku Journal 2017 jvg # 18 invisible cells hold ancestors DNA my blood in two vials
  24. It has been decades since I have been to a library, and I always loved the library. There was the public library in the town where I grew up, the college library in that same hometown, to a lesser extent my high school library, and in later years the law library open to the public in the superior courthouse. Then came the internet, and most everything could be accessed conveniently from the comfort of home. But really, metal detectors? Armed librarians? Is this for real? I don't think I could stomach it. The poem is unmistakably Parsley, albeit with a hint of Heaney. The man who reminds us is a relic like Jethro Tull's Aqualung, yet unoffensive. There is the mention of "ancient grills," and I read girls and hills. Am I that relic as I stumble, in a drunken stupor, repeating the last few words I hear like Dougie Jones in David Lynch's Twin Peaks twenty-five years later? Could be ... came for ... Remember what we came for. And I am again reminded that "nobody is ever saved alone," how in this life we don't need money, we need each other. I stand in awe. Tony
  25. And there it is, that language of locality, that sense of place I love in a poem. I loved this vignette of the speaker's (an adult child's) trip to the grocery store: the grandparents he shops (and probably lives) with; his football mate; and Lucy, who would certainly catch my eye. Tony
  26. ... and I, as always, appreciate the local references, the sense of place. Tony
  27. For me, rhyme is another device, a tool the poet has at his disposal. I rhyme when I want to, but very often I don't. So true. Some of the most clever use of rhyme, simile, and metaphor can be found in rap.
  28. To Rhyme or Not to Rhyme Many poets today believe rhyme is old fashioned, artificial or strained. Rhyme has a long history in verse which dates back to before the written word. Stories of love, war, gods and heroes were told through oral traditions and often rhyme was used to assist memory in order that the tale could be passed on. Since the written word language has evolved and rhyme has become more sophisticated than just a tool for communication, it has become an art form. Still in much of today's poetry, rhyme has been dismissed or relegated to light verse. However, the modern day rapper shows us that rhyme with the right rhythm, can be timely, dynamic and powerful. Rhyme is "the one chord we have added to the Greek lyre." Oscar Wilde It is all about sonics. There are many variations of "rhyme", which basically is the echo of sound, a melodic link between words most often at the end of the line. The ancient Welsh in their strict code of meters, taught that to prevent the "main" rhyme from overpowering the line, it should be balanced by "harmony of sound", and encouraged the use of alliteration, consonance, assonance, internal rhyme and more, all forms of rhyme A poem doesn't have to be end rhymed but I listen for "harmony of sound" in every poem I read. Rhyme Variables aicill rhyme (Commonly used in Celtic verse forms.) According to the NPEOPP aicill rhyme is simply rhyming an end word of one line with a word somewhere early in the next line. Robin Skelton's Shapes of our Singing takes it a step further and states aicill rhyme occurs when the end word of the first line is disyllabic. An on-line source describing Gaelic pronunciation takes it even a step further describing aicill rhyme as occuring when the last stressed syllable of an end word rhymes with the next to last unstressed word in the next line with no mention that the end word need by disyllabic. (Gaelic examples I've been able to find seem to support all 3 definitions, of course I can't really hear the stressed/unstressed definition but one example appeared as if the internal rhyme could be unstressed by the position in the line and the words around it.) alliteration (from Latin al litera- to letter) The echoed beginning sound of a stressed syllable with the beginning sound of another stressed syllable in close proximity within the line. Strictly used, it should be the stressed syllable of successive words in a line, most commonly repeated consonants that phonetically match e.g. Little ladies like lovely Lillys or Center for Secret Sisters. However beginning vowel sounds most always alliterate e.g The ant eater entered the exit. alternate rhyme Rhyme pattern within a stanza, end rhyme change every other line. abab cdcd etc or ababab cdcdcd etc or abababab cdcdcdcd etc . assonance A rhetorical device in which vowel sounds are repeated regardless of the consonants before and after. In English this is usually within a line but in other cultures, Welsh and Spanish in particular this can be between internal or end words of different lines. broken rhyme Breaking an end word to create rhyme with another line. eg. Breaking the word heartbreak carrying the "break" to the next line so that heart can rhyme with part. caesura rhyme Couplet rhymed at the caesura mid line and alternating at the end of the line as if an alternate rhymed quatrain abab is written as a couplet. caudate rhyme Same as tail rhyme, the short line at the end of the stanza rhymes with another short line within the stanza, with longer lines in between. chain rhyme Rhyme pattern within a stanza, interlocking rhyme that links one stanza to the next. Such as in the Terza Rima rhyme aba bcb cdc etc. There are various chain techniques with a long history climbing or step rhyme rhyme that moves in or out one syllable per line, the pattern is at the discretion of the poet x x x a x x a x x a x x a x x x x a x x x x a x consonance, imperfect rhyme / near rhyme, oblique rhyme / off rhyme / slant rhyme Echoed consonant sounds but different vowel sounds as in season and raisin or sometimes only the last consonant sound such as fame and room. This is a simplified meaning, definitions of consonance or slant rhyme seem to wander all over the place. For a more complicated definition see "consonate". also slant rhyme. "He whispered into the dark, dank heart of the night" The prominent and repeated "d" "t" and "k" sounds are consonance. consonant rhyme Same consonant sound at either the beginning of the lines (head rhyme) or the last consonant at the end of the line (common in Celtic and Spanish verse). cross rhyme When the end word rhymes with a word in the middle of the next line. This comes from the old long hemistiched couplets in which rhyme occurs (ab)(ba): L1 xxxa,xxxb L2 xxxb,xxxa. NPEOPP. double rhyme When both syllables of a 2 syllable word rhyme with both syllables of another 2 syllable word. e.g. dapper / rapper dunadh Beginning and ending the poem with the same syllable, word or line bringing the poem full circle. (A defining feature of ancient Celtic poetry.) envelope rhyme Rhyme pattern within a stanza, rhyme enclosed within a stanza. e.g. abba or abccba or abcddcba. exact / full / identical ordinary / perfect/ strict / true rhyme The echo of vowel and consonant sounds, in English rhyme occurs between stressed syllables. bait / wait, begin / sin, syllable / laughable eye or sight rhyme Rhyme that has the same spelling but sound differently. e.g. laughter / daughter idea/flea feminine rhyme A rhyme of 2 or more syllables in which the stress is on other than the last syllable such as moral / quarrel or healthiest / wealthiest framed rhyme or para-rhyme Consonance occurring front and back of the word. back/bike boat/bait half rhyme Feminine or three-syllable words in which the initial stressed syllables rhyme but not the unstressed syllables e.g. clingy / singing head rhyme When rhyme appears at the beginning of the line in the first word or syllable rather than at the end of the line. head and tail rhyme First and last, usually referring to the first and last word in a line are rhymed. identity rhyme / rime riche / rich rhyme Ordinary rhyme beginning a step backward. The sounds start being matched before the last stressed vowel. All 3 sounds of the syllable are echoed in rich rhyme, as in foul/fowl as compared to ordinary rhyme growl/fowl. Rich rhyme, often called rime riche or identity rhyme is more commonly used in French prosody than in English. interlaced rhyme A word in the middle of one line rhymes with a word in the middle of another. internal rhyme A word within a line rhymes with another word within the line whether or not it is at the end of the line. Leonine rhyme A line written with 2 syllable rhyme midway and at the end of the line. Originally employed to rhyme at a midway caesura and line end, found in ancient Latin writing. "They took some honey and plenty of money."---- Edward Lear, Owl and the Pussycat. light rhyme The rhyming of a stressed syllable with an unstressed syllable, like some / ransom masculine rhyme Rhyme in a 1 syllable word or on the accented last syllable of a multi syllable word. mono-rhyme Rhyme pattern, single rhyme within a verse or stanza. aaaaaaa or stanza aaaa bbbb cccc etc. Nursery rhyme Rhymed verse meant for children. reverse rhyme Echoed sounds of the first consonant and stressed vowel but not the last consonant. bat / back sectional rhyme Internal rhyme within the line. e.g.:she'd be his wife, his life in song. spelling rhyme End words that have similar spelling but don't rhyme. move/love . tail rhyme In a stanza of long lines, the last line is shorter and is rhymed with one other line within the stanza which is also shorter. triple rhyme words that rhyme in 3 syllables eg mystery / history . tumbling rhyme Mono-rhymed lines until the rhyme runs out of energy then the lines switch to a new mono-rhymed series.
  29. To Rhyme or Not to Rhyme

    Many poets today believe rhyme is old fashioned, artificial or strained.  Rhyme has a long history in verse which dates back to before the written word.  Stories of love, war, gods and heroes were told through oral traditions and often rhyme was used to assist memory in order that the tale could be passed on.  Since the written word language has evolved and rhyme has become more sophisticated than just a tool for communication, it has become an art form.  Still in much of today's poetry, rhyme has been dismissed or relegated to light verse.  Still, the modern day rapper shows us that rhyme with the right rhythm, can be timely, dynamic and powerful. 

    Rhyme is "the one chord we have added to the Greek lyre."  Oscar Wilde  It is all about sonics.  There are many variations of "rhyme", which basically is the echo of sound, a melodic link between words most often at the end of the line.  The ancient Welsh in their strict code of meters, taught that to prevent the "main" rhyme from overpowering the line, it should be balanced by  "harmony of sound",  and encouraged the use of alliteration, consonance, assonance, internal rhyme and more, all forms of rhyme

    A poem doesn't have to be end rhymed but I listen for "harmony of sound" in every poem I read. 

    Rhyme Variables

    aicill rhyme  (Commonly used in Celtic verse forms.) According to the NPEOPP aicill rhyme is simply echoing the sound of an end word of one line with a word somewhere early in the next line. Robin Skelton's Shapes of our Singing takes it a step further and states aicill rhyme occurs when the end word of the first line is disyllabic. 
    alliteration  (from Latin al litera- to letter) The echoed beginning sound of a stressed syllable with the beginning sound of another stressed syllable in close proximity within the line.  Strictly used,  it should be the stressed syllable of successive words in a line, most commonly repeated consonants that phonetically match e.g. Little ladies like lovely Lillys or Center for Secret Sisters.  However beginning vowel sounds most always alliterate e.g The ant eater entered the exit.
     
    alternate rhyme Rhyme pattern within a stanza, end rhyme change every other line. abab cdcd etc or ababab cdcdcd etc or abababab cdcdcdcd etc . 
    assonance  A rhetorical device in which vowel sounds are repeated regardless of the consonants before and after. In English this is usually within a line but in other cultures, Welsh and Spanish in particular this can be between internal or end words of different lines.
     
    broken rhyme Breaking an end word to create rhyme with another line. eg. Breaking the word heartbreak carrying the "break" to the next line so that heart can rhyme with part.
     
    caesura rhyme Couplet rhymed at the caesura mid line and alternating at the end of the line as if an alternate rhymed quatrain abab is written as a couplet.
     
    caudate rhyme Same as tail rhyme, the short line at the end of the stanza rhymes with another short line within the stanza, with longer lines in between.
     
    chain rhyme Rhyme pattern within a stanza, interlocking rhyme that links one stanza to the next. Such as in the Terza Rima rhyme aba bcb cdc etc. There are various chain techniques with a long history
     
    consonance, imperfect rhyme / near rhyme, oblique rhyme / off rhyme / slant rhyme Echoed consonant sounds but different vowel sounds as in season and raisin or sometimes only the last consonant sound such as fame and room. This is a simplified meaning, definitions of consonance or slant rhyme seem to wander all over the place. For a more complicated definition see "consonate". also slant rhyme. "He whispered into the dark, dank heart of the night" The prominent and repeated "d" "t" and "k" sounds are consonance.
     
    consonant rhyme Same consonant sound at either the beginning of the lines (head rhyme) or the last consonant at the end of the line (common in Celtic and Spanish verse).
     
    cross rhyme When the end word rhymes with a word in the middle of the next line. This comes from the old long hemistiched couplets in which rhyme occurs (ab)(ba): L1 xxxa,xxxb L2 xxxb,xxxa. NPEOPP.
     
    double rhyme When both syllables of a 2 syllable word rhyme with both syllables of another 2 syllable word. e.g. dapper / rapper
     
    dunadh Beginning and ending the poem with the same syllable, word or line bringing the poem full circle. (A defining feature of ancient Celtic poetry.) 
     
    envelope rhyme Rhyme pattern within a stanza, rhyme enclosed within a stanza. e.g. abba or abccba or abcddcba.
     
    exact / full / identical ordinary / perfect/ strict / true rhyme The echo of vowel and consonant sounds, in English rhyme occurs between stressed syllables.     bait / wait, begin / sin,  syllable / laughable
    eye or sight rhyme Rhyme that has the same spelling but sound differently. e.g. laughter / daughter idea/flea
     
    feminine rhyme

    A rhyme of 2 or more syllables in which the stress is on other than the last syllable such as
    moral / quarrel or healthiest / wealthiest

    framed rhyme or para-rhyme Consonance occurring front and back of the word. back/bike  boat/bait
     
    half rhyme Feminine or three-syllable words in which the initial stressed syllables rhyme but not the unstressed syllables e.g. clingy / singing
     
    head rhyme When rhyme appears at the beginning of the line in the first word or syllable rather than at the end of the line.
    head and tail rhyme First and last, usually referring to the first and last word in a line are rhymed.
     
    identity rhyme / rime riche /  rich rhyme Ordinary rhyme beginning a step backward. The sounds start being matched before the last stressed vowel. All 3 sounds of the syllable are echoed in rich rhyme, as in foul/fowl as compared to ordinary rhyme growl/fowl. Rich rhyme, often called rime riche or identity rhyme is more commonly used in French prosody than in English.
    interlaced rhyme A word in the middle of one line rhymes with a word in the middle of another.
     
    internal rhyme A word within a line rhymes with another word within the line whether or not it is at the end of the line.
    Leonine rhyme A line written with 2 syllable rhyme midway and at the end of the line. Originally employed to rhyme at a midway caesura and line end, found in ancient Latin writing. "They took some honey and plenty of money."---- Edward Lear, Owl and the Pussycat.
     
    light rhyme The rhyming of a stressed syllable with an unstressed syllable, like some / ransom
     
    masculine rhyme Rhyme in a 1 syllable word or on the accented last syllable of a multi syllable word.
     
    mono-rhyme Rhyme pattern, single rhyme within a verse or stanza. aaaaaaa or stanza aaaa bbbb cccc etc.
    Nursery rhyme Rhymed verse meant for children.
     
    reverse rhyme Echoed sounds of the first consonant and stressed vowel but not the last consonant.  bat / back
     
    sectional rhyme Internal rhyme within the line. e.g.:she'd be his wife, his life in song.
     
    spelling rhyme End words that have similar spelling but don't rhyme. move/love .
     
    tail rhyme In a stanza of long lines, the last line is shorter and is rhymed with one other line within the stanza which is also shorter.
     
    triple rhyme words that rhyme in 3 syllables eg mystery / history .
     
    tumbling rhyme Mono-rhymed lines until the rhyme runs out of energy then the lines switch to a new mono-rhymed series.  

     

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