Jump to content
Poetry Magnum Opus
Sign in to follow this  
Tinker

What are we reading, besides poetry?

Recommended Posts

Tinker

I think there used to be a thread where members could post the book they were currently reading or that they had just read. I am always interested in recommendations for good reading so I am setting up a new thread.

 

I'll start it off, I hope others will add books as they read them. I am currently nearing the end of

 

Résistance – A Woman’s Journal of Struggle and Defiance in Occupied France, by Agnès Humbert translation by Barbara Mellor.

 

Agnès Humbert is a real life woman who died in France in 1963. Agnes, a French art historian before the war, formed a group within the French Resistance during the Nazi occupation of France. The group was eventually caught by the Gestapo and several of the men in the group were executed. Agnes and others were sent to Germany to serve as slave labor. This is the journal Agnès kept throughout her experience as a Resistance fighter and during her time spent in slave labor. Pretty powerful!

 

~~Tink


~~ © ~~ Poems by Judi Van Gorder ~~

For permission to use this work you can write to Tinker1111@icloud.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Gatekeeper

I know you say nonpoetry, but I have "something poetry" going at all times so will incude that anyway. My novel reading is sparse by comparison (prefer short stories) and has, of late, been limited to audiobooks, not included here.

 

So here is what keeps my reading glasses handy . . .

 

Recently finshed:

 

The Lady in Kicking Horse Reservoir, poems by Richard Hugo (1923 - 1982). ". . . wrote of abandoned places and abandoned people", especially of the likes found in Montana. Interesting language usage but at times obscure. Publ 1973

 

The Secret Life of Your Cat : Unlock the Mysteries of Your Pet's Behavior by Vicky Halls. From a sometimes noticable British point of view. Light reading for cat keepers. Publ 2010

 

Now reading:

 

Four Fish / The Future of the Last Wild Food by Paul Greenberg (NY,USA). A biography/expose of sorts of the worldwide take/market of salmon, tuna, bass & cod. An engaging and enlightening read. Always good to get to know what you are about to eat and how it got to your plate (and if it will in the future). Publ 2010

 

How Poetry Works by Philip Davies Roberts. Just started this - no opinion yet - a library book-sale item. Author is of Canadian, British and Australian influences and is a musician. Publ 1986

 

Poetspeak: In their work, about their work by Paul B. Janeczko (CT, USA). Another used book, just started - no opinion. Author is teacher, writer, anthologist. Publ 1983

 

And various material from a couple of short story anthologies . . .

 

Current Casual Study:

 

Collins Complete British Wildlife by Paul Sterry. A photoguide. Publ 1997

 

Next up: (library items picked up this afternoon):

 

How the Government Got in Your Backyard / Superweeds, Frankenfoods, Lawn Wars, and the (Nonpartison) Truth About Environmental Policies - by Jeff Gillman & Eric Heberlig. Jeff is a university horticulturist / Eric is a poli-sci prof.(MN/NC,USA), so that should give you some clues. Publ 2011

 

In Fifty Years We'll All Be Chicks . . . And Other Complaints from an Angry Middle-Aged White Guy by Adam Carolla. Author is radio & TV host, comedian and actor. Publ 2010

 

Edited by Gatekeeper

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tinker

No wonder I couldn't find the old thread, it is in a different forum. Oh well I guess it won't hurt to have 2 threads on books to read.

 

Thanks for responding Gatekeeper. I too listen to Audio books, especially when I drive to my son's. It is an 8 1/2 hour drive and I just put the CDs into my car and drive. I love audio books. The Resistance is a paperback book and it is not a novel. It is a journal kept by a French woman during the Nazi occupation of her country. It was published in France shortly after the war but only recently translated into English.

 

The Lady in Kicking Horse Reservoir intrigues me. I love titles with odd names like that. You certainly provide quite an eclectic list of books. Something for everybody. A man of many interests.

 

I know what you mean, I too usually have a couple of poetry books going at one time. Often a book of poems and another about writing poetry. My latest find is an online book which appears to be an old textbook at Google Ebooks.com. An Introduction to Poetry by Jay Broadus Hubbell and John Owen Beaty. Its copyright has run out and it is now in the public domain and available for Free download for anyone who wants it. It has some good information in it with wonderful example poems. I don't usually read this type of book cover to cover. I pick and choose what I want to read.

 

I wonder if anyone uses a Kindle or a Nook? My husband who is an avid reader (never poetry) loves his Nook. He reads mostly nonfiction adventures, spy and mystery novels and autobiographies. Especially when he heads for the boat in Mexico he downloads several books into his Nook and he has all of the reading material he needs for his stay right in that one little device. He chose the Nook over the Kindle only because Barnes and Noble have a Nook specialist in every store and if he has any questions they are always available.

 

~~Tink

 


~~ © ~~ Poems by Judi Van Gorder ~~

For permission to use this work you can write to Tinker1111@icloud.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
goldenlangur

I agree, Tink - another thread to discuss books is a great idea. :D

 

Pretty impressive, your recent reading list, Gatekeeper.

 

The book you mention, Tink, sounds very interesting.

 

I must admit that I read very little about writing poetry but anthologies of some favorites - Heaney, Hughes, Basho, Issa, Tagore, Rumi are what I dip into every now and then.

 

I do like non-fiction and have recently read Tomalin's biography of Thomas Hardy, Essays in Zen Buddhism by DT Suzuki and also an old biography called, The Quest for Proust by Andre Maurois.. Proust is a writer who both intrigues and befuddles me mainly because I don't read French and I always feel I am getting something once-removed in the translations of his works I have read.

 

The drawings of Leonardo da Vinci by A. E. Popham (found among my father's books) is another work into which I have been dipping.


goldenlangur

 

 

Even a single enemy is too many and a thousand friends too few - Bhutanese saying.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
fdelano

Tales of the Jazz Ageby F. Scott Fitzgerald.

fdh

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Guidelines.