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YarnSpinner

Who Is A Poet

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YarnSpinner

Down through history, contributors of poetry, prose, or other means of written expression, have been accepted by readers to be great works of art; writers are considered great authors.

 

I do not expect all readers to follow my reason for writing this. The following article is written to create an avenue for discussion, and I am open to be enlightened,and accept critism without prejudice

This is a question I pose to all who care to reply
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WHO IS A POET?
This may seem like a meaningless point to ponder, but for me, I can think of several reasons to do so. This essay is not meant to belittle anyone's writing abilities, or interpretive capabilities of understanding a poem or story. It is meant to encourage every writer, or reader to understand... why does a poet write?
A Point To Ponder...
As a rule, a poet composes sentences, structures, and phrases, using picturesque words, theory, or spiritually inspired thoughts, to please or inform a reader. A poet can write in a fashion, that will intentionally or unintentionally, confuse or aggravate a reader, of his/her true meaning, or purpose of each passage written. No matter how motivated a Poet’s intent, or how eloquent the depth of feeling in each written word, a Poet cannot completely express what is in his or her Mind’s Eye, or Aching Heart.
WHY?
Definition and significance of the Poet’s work, can be lost during translation. The Mind's Eye of a reader is capable of visualizing several different scenarios of a Poet's work. Each reader's mind is developed to see his, or her interpretation of written words, according to his or her age, or educated mental ability to perceive and understand.
So... why is it then... writers from our distant past, who had a capability of manipulating with ease, use of expressive, eloquent words, can be misinterpreted, or misunderstood by average readers of today... yet these writers are still considered to be great Poets?
Why also... are educated Tutors of today, the only one's who profess to know the answers, when educated as they are; their perception and understanding is only as deep as their educated Mind' allows them to see?
A Writer's Answer to Consider...
A Poet writes, because only he or she can put to words, with the best of their abilities, what actually transpires deep within themselves. Their words are meant to express... to show feelings, such as Love, Hate, Confusion, Bitterness, Sadness, and Happiness. Many writers apply words to paper or parchment, to find Solace, Friendship, or Time to work out their own problems, which they cannot explain to others by any other means.
Words Can be Cathartic...
(An Analogy)
When individuals who cannot seem to understand why they cry... pencil and paper; pen and ink; computers and hard drives, give them the "Out" they need to purge and heal. In time, as they reread their own thoughts, life's problems may seem just a bit more clear. To understand one's self, one can learn to control their future.
Conclusion:
If none of the above pertains to you... I suggest to everyone... write just for the love of it. What comes from your Mind's Eye... speaks who you are. Maybe that is all great poets were attempting to explain.
YarnSpinner
copyright 2013

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David W. Parsley

Hi Yarnspinner, welcome to the forum. Your brief essay talks to a number of interesting points. Regarding the first couple of sections, I find resonance with others who have thought along similar lines, though not exclusively with respect to poets. Ralph Waldo Emerson once said, "To be great is to be misunderstood.” Incomplete, even erroneous, apprehension seems to be the doom of all great thinkers. Dominant figures are continually subjected to hostile and benevolent revisionism, often emerging unrecognizable from the process. We adapt them to our own cause and purpose. They aren't around to discourage us in this enterprise.

 

The only excuse for poetry is that it is inherently a gift that the reader is invited to make one's own. This is particularly true of lyric poetry, more so the more confessional it is. And I think this is the vein of poetry you are discussing. In my view the "greatness" of a lyric poem derives from the broad recognition of a piece's ability to speak to and enhance one's own body of sensory and emotive experience. The more universally felt this power, the more acutely acknowledged it's greatness. Appealing to another notable source, Walt Whitman, "To have great poets, there must be great audiences." Perhaps this tribute is sufficient.

 

- Dave

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YarnSpinner

Hi Yarnspinner, welcome to the forum. Your brief essay talks to a number of interesting points. Regarding the first couple of sections, I find resonance with others who have thought along similar lines, though not exclusively with respect to poets. Ralph Waldo Emerson once said, "To be great is to be misunderstood.” Incomplete, even erroneous, apprehension seems to be the doom of all great thinkers. Dominant figures are continually subjected to hostile and benevolent revisionism, often emerging unrecognizable from the process. We adapt them to our own cause and purpose. They aren't around to discourage us in this enterprise.

 

The only excuse for poetry is that it is inherently a gift that the reader is invited to make one's own. This is particularly true of lyric poetry, more so the more confessional it is. And I think this is the vein of poetry you are discussing. In my view the "greatness" of a lyric poem derives from the broad recognition of a piece's ability to speak to and enhance one's own body of sensory and emotive experience. The more universally felt this power, the more acutely acknowledged it's greatness. Appealing to another notable source, Walt Whitman, "To have great poets, there must be great audiences." Perhaps this tribute is sufficient.

 

- Dave

 

Hello Dave:

 

Thank you for your input. I have to admit, I do not spend much time reading work of great poets. The work I do injoy is that of Robert Service. His poetry and short stories read much like I write. I do not try to mimic his style, but I find I understand, and am able to read it as readily as I do my own writings. What I write... I consider as entertainment for a reader. Some get the message, some don't; it's not for me to decide.

 

I fully believe, as written in my last sentence of conclusion: What comes from your Mind's Eye... speaks who you are.

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Larsen M. Callirhoe

hi yarnspinner. nice to meet you. I write poetry to release feelings bottled up deep inside me since i have a lot going on within me. you see i am paralyzed and started writing poetry after becoming paralyzed to release my bottled up depression to release my depression.

 

victor

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rhymeguy

Hello,

I recently returned to this site so if my response seems delayed it's because I have just read your essay.

 

I think this essay should be required reading, especially for writers exposing their work to the world for the first time. It is insightful and freeing.

 

Thank you for expressing your thoughts so well

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