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dedalus

Korosaremashita

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dedalus

I have a feeling I'm going over my limit for the week ... but no CW warnings!!

 

It never ever

ceases to amaze

how girls, take wives

for example,

know how to hurt you.

They zero in

on that millimetre-wide

chink in your armour

clinically

with a swift insertion

followed by a slow slow twist.

At other times,

neatly sliced,

you can walk ten paces

before your head

falls off.

---------------------------------

Korosaremashita -- this is a tidy little example of the Japanese passive causative. It will bring pinkness to scholarly cheeks. It means exactly, precisely, what it says.


Drown your sorrows in drink, by all means, but the real sorrows can swim

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waxwings

Ha! Elucidate on that passive causative. It may help me to better se why I have trouble writing bettr haiku.

 

This is in the vein where it says English has three moods. Latvian hasfive and other labguages even more. It is to be understood that inflected languages have a special verb endings to differentiate the optative,and hearsay moods from the subjunctive, imperative and indicative.

 

And I would like to see you twist a blade that is inserted through a slit and not break it off the haft.

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dedalus

Hiya waxy,

 

Can't live without verbs, man! Nouns I can take or leave.

Korosu is the Japanese verb to kill. Go work it out.

 

Cheers


Drown your sorrows in drink, by all means, but the real sorrows can swim

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waxwings
Hiya waxy,

 

Can't live without verbs, man! Nouns I can take or leave.

Korosu is the Japanese verb to kill. Go work it out.

 

Cheers

 

I agree that without the right amount of action a poem is static, flat, dead.

 

I was mistaken in evoking the idea of mood, whereas the "causative passive" is (I did work it out, thanks to your nudge) a form of passive voice formed by a suffix (-es) as I guessed.

 

In English, lacking inflection. the form is made up of an auxiliary verb (any tense) and a 'focing verb' (in past perfect) to create the passive voice plus the infinitive of the descriptive verb, e.g., "The abstinent man was/is/ will be made to drink whiskey.

 

Are you alluding to a woman's "ability to perhaps make one to want kill her?" affraid.gif

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dedalus

That "perhaps" bit is crucial. There'd be an awful lot less women walking around otherwise ....


Drown your sorrows in drink, by all means, but the real sorrows can swim

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waxwings

Funny's the word. And fun too. The poem, I mean.

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