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  2. Tinker

    2019 April is National Poetry Month

    April 21 Whacking Away Today, tall grass,standing sentinel to the earthabruptly mowed downby my trusty weed-whacker. ~~jvgNotes: ▼ Prompt: sentinel 24 syllable challenge.
  3. Yesterday
  4. dr_con

    Day 22: Relentless

    Relentless 4/22/2019 The passage of Time cannot reasonably be called a march lacking syncopation although even a glass box uni - verse it is relentless a moment ago I blinked against the setting Sun bare branches bloomed as exiting the womb assaulted all both of us Time is more like a glass football he says rather than a box and I admit to not remembering details of being born half a century ago but I swear it still feels like Yesterday or maybe Tomorrow.
  5. Tinker

    Day 21: Anything to Avoid Enlightenment

    Zen Master, This brought a smile to my face. ~~Tink
  6. Tinker

    Wednesday Walk

    Welcome back David, we've missed you. You ran a marathon of replies here yesterday. Thank you for all of your comments. This is the month of "poem a day" so I appreciate that you commented on so many poems. When I saw your name, I was kind of looking for a new one from you, but didn't find one. I hope you are still writing and will be adding one of your own to the mix soon. ~~Tink
  7. Last week
  8. Anything to Avoid Enlightenment #deepadation 4/21/2019 “I can lose my ego better than you” -Cliff Anderson what silly animals humans are believing they are One singular when we are a concrescence of multitudes our singled celled colonies build vast slippery cities with complex employments frictionless politics and a miraculous ecstatic exchange between exogenous and endogenous with never a moralizing self satisfied voice declaring This is enlightenment but certainly not that!
  9. David W. Parsley

    Wednesday Walk

    Judi, I am going to end with this bewitching tribute to Spring. The ultimate in simplicity, it is anything but simplistic in its zen-like encroachment of the Enlightened. Stirred and Grateful, - David on a Balmy Easter
  10. David W. Parsley

    Digits 4/4/2019

    Doc, the commentators all got it right, but I am sticking with, "This is really COOL!" There is so much about the entire sapient race here, but then you pull it down into an interlocked family. Then the zoom function focuses on a bone pipe, a single pair of parting hands, the urgent grasping of the narrator's essential Other for the substantial. And then that totally unexpected final line! Whew! Okay, dude, I don't know what zapped you this month, but I would like to request you do every April like this one. Okay? You'll need that much time to rest up for the next one... Keep It Coming, - David
  11. David W. Parsley

    Day 19: There was a Time

    This one works very well for me, doc. Through the process of an oblique narrative, the narrator becomes one of the homeless. Thanks, - David
  12. David W. Parsley

    Sleepless in Occidental

    No fancy imagery or mastery of a difficult fixed form here: just excellent use of white space, balance of diction and image. And a very witty final line! I really like this one! Thanks, Tink! - David
  13. David W. Parsley

    Seder Meal

    Reminds me of an account of the Donner Party I read many years ago, which had a sentence near the beginning that chillingly reads (as I recall), "The slain walked at the side of the slayer." Thank you, Judy. (I think) - David
  14. David W. Parsley

    Pontypool Park: A Formative Year

    Hi Phil, I always like your work and this is no exception, "rust" notwithstanding (I don't see no schtinking rust but what do I know 😏). I, too, prefer many things about rev. 2, but confess that I really liked the final line of the original. I also prefer the original "scuttles" to "hurries", as more vivid and superior in symbol. Everything else works very well indeed! Cheers! - David
  15. David W. Parsley

    Mariner

    Barry, Ohhhh, yeah. This one touches mythic waters lapping at the roots of my subconsciousness, a part that is contained to a tamed miniature that still remembers the epic potentialities still out there, not yet exhausted. Nice imagery and symbol. I agree with tink and tony: one of your best! Thanks, - David
  16. David W. Parsley

    Witch

    Tony, I somehow missed this thing the first few times around (that's what I get, I guess!). The spell worked on me, too! Like Mac I suspect, you turned what was developing into a seductively guilty pleasure into a Halloween style curse! Yowsers! Not on Easter, dude!! I like all the changes you made along the way. If you ever get a hankering to touch this piece again, I would point to the final line as a place that could be dictionally unkinked a little. Going Back to Easter Stuff. Now! - Dave 😯😉
  17. David W. Parsley

    Whitley bay

    Hi Barry, Remarkably evocative and vivid. After reading your poem, I feel like I have been to this bay. Luscious imagery and language place the human condition in the framework of a natural world that listens but does not intervene. Matthew Arnold's "eternal note of sadness" is an unheard melody in this piece. And as Keats tells us, "unheard melodies are sweeter." Very nice! - Dave P.S. Watch for typos, e.g. "story's" instead of the intended "stories".
  18. David W. Parsley

    Redundant

    dc, Heartfelt agreement with all of the above! The recurrent images and ghosts bring a refraining action that echoes like the ripple of memory. Then, bam, you hit the reader with consecutive images that completes with a rush of total clarity and summarizing pathos. Well done. - Davd
  19. David W. Parsley

    Golgotha

    A blameless man... Yes, aren't we all... Thank you, Tinker. - Dave
  20. David W. Parsley

    Slaughtered Lambs

    Devastating
  21. David W. Parsley

    The Building of Future Ruins

    Hi doc, A worthy production in a body of such outpourings that you have managed to accomplish during this month of daily poetry. Impressive, to say the least! I don't know how you and Tinker are doing it, really. Nice work. Regarding the closing refrain, the closest I could come was to a synthetic religious sect that developed in southern regions of the Americas, where the phrase, "Hekua, baba, hekua!" translates roughly as, "Blessings, father, blessings!" There are connections to an osira (roughly, a deity) who both imposes and rescinds heinous diseases like smallpox, but I could not follow this well without at least a partial immersion in the topic which I declined to undertake. This capstones the early stanzas dealing with this theme, playing the universal chant of the perplexed body of victim and bereaved trying to comprehend forces that lead us without discernible reason or cause to slaughter and/or personal loss, hoping to attract a benevolence or obscure kind of judgement which will in turn grant a reprieving stay. The piece taps into a timeless human element intersecting with a broader spiritual impulse that guides and misguides our journey in aggregate as well as individually. BTW, I note the word abulition - did you intend ablution? Or is this a specialist's jargon, perhaps even a doc-invented term? (One never knows!) Thanks, - Dave
  22. David W. Parsley

    This Man

    Joel, A timely and moving piece, as doc says. I particularly admire the theological irony of the speculated use of sheep bones in the cat o' nine tails used to scourge "this man" (nice use of ambiguity and understatement.) In addition to explicating aspects of the device deliberately introduced to increase pain and damage to the victim, it intersects with a key doctrinal precept that he accepted torment on behalf of the sheep of his pasture, a torment engendered by the trespasses of those very sheep. Isaiah explains it well: "But he was wounded for our transgressions, he was bruised for our iniquities: the chastisement of our peace was upon him; and with his stripes we are healed." Thank you for this. - Dave
  23. Tinker

    Slaughtered Lambs

    Slaughtered Lambs Easter bunnies and little lambs compliment this Holy Day, but this morning, headlines, "Hundreds Dead or Injured in Sri Lanka" mock it. Toppled Easter Lillys, a broken statue of Our Lady, littered sanctuary, earlier, a priest lay bloodied and unconscious while in the wooden pews worshipers found mangled and lifeless. A bomb blast ravaged Easter service. The sense of it makes no sense, targets of hate, religious zeal, or political upheaval, none of it good enough for the death of one lamb. ~~Judi Van Gorder
  24. Tinker

    2019 April is National Poetry Month

    April 20 #25 all day long TV show drones binge watching series ~~jvg
  25. Tinker

    Lycorine in the Living Room

    Hi Badge, A gem of a poem from something as simple as, a vase of fresh cut flowers. Something I do regularly. I just cut a basket full of Camelias and put them in a vase that was a wedding gift of 55 years ago. I don't remember from who. ~~Tink
  26. Translating Silence #deepadaption 4.20.2019 “I never knew words could say that” Kevin Spracher I stopped writing letters before the digital made it quaint always misunderstood held accountable for things not said my excusable lament I didn’t mean to imply I never meant questions of meaning a victim of unspoken intentions until I stopped paying lipservice to our Sojourner/Wanderer natures feeling it in our bones hollow: White spring flowers past glassed window holds in abeyance leaden skies soon will glisten wet and smell of mammalian flesh attracting exclusive pollinators. Travelers all from Shore to Shore translating Silence.
  27. Tinker

    Golgotha

    Haha, I really intended to end with the Yellow Star poem but then received a challenge to write a poem using the Verse Form, Balance. I didn't have a subject so when desperate I fell back on the Holy Day. I closed my office for the afternoon using Good Friday as an excuse, but instead of going to services I wrote this poem then came home. I couldn't sit through the Stations of the Cross today. I promise, Easter will be bunnies and little lambs. ~~Tink
  28. dr_con

    Golgotha

    Ahh yes You and Joel are reminding me of my upbringing in delightful and sometimes terrifying ways. Loved this piece. Juris
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