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tonyv

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About tonyv

  • Birthday 08/14/1970

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    Rhode Island

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  1. For the longest time I have wanted to read a specific poem from which, to date, I have only been able to read a few verses. The first two verses of the poem are included in a book I have about meter. Though I have searched online, I have not been able to find the poem reproduced in its entirety anywhere. I am super excited to report that yesterday I had occasion to re-visit an institution from which I have been estranged for decades: the public library. I obtained a library card and borrowed three books. The books are, of course, from the poetry section, and one of them is a collection which includes the poem I have wanted to read. The collection is called Touch (The University of Chicago Press, Chicago/Faber and Faber Limited, London, 1967) by Thom Gunn , and the poem I have been looking for is called "Pierce Street." My latest publication here at Poetry Magnum Opus is an aubade called "Vintages." It begins Brown sunlight creeps through slats, around/edges and tans her naked shoulder ... I am considering the possibility that I was influenced, subconsciously, by the first lines of "Pierce Street" where Gunn writes, ... Long threads of sunlight slant/Past curtains, blind, and slat ... " I would not deny or try to hide influence from anyone. To the contrary, I have wanted to share "Pierce Street" in PMO's A Poem I Read Today forum for several years, and now that I have the complete poem available to me, I can even use it as an example to expound upon this matter of influence. For the sake of example, take the words and image in the lines cited above from Gunn's "Pierce Street" and compare/contrast them with the requisite words and image in tonyv's "Vintages." Both are talking about window dressings, about daylight making its way into a room. There are two words in common: "sunlight" and "slat(s)." But I will posit that that is where the similarities end. "Vintages" is an aubade, whereas "Pierce Street" is something else. I found it uncanny that in a part of "Pierce Street" which I had not read when I wrote "Vintages," Gunn wrote, Out of night now the flesh-tint starts to dawn. When composing "Vintages" I searched for a while for a word or expression to convey "flesh-tint" and settled on "tans her naked shoulder." I wonder had I read all of "Pierce Street" before I wrote "Vintages" would I have subconsciously pilfered "flesh-tint"? Probably not. I considered "tints" on my own and chose "tans." I am drawn to the works of poets from several eras, one of which includes Edgar Bowers and Thom Gunn. Both were students of Stanford University's Yvor Winters. It is their writing, their style which attracts me. To some degree it is the subject matter of their poems, but mostly it is their use of contemporary language in metrical verse. From other schools I admire Larkin and the loveliness of Tuckerman. I have other sources of inspiration from fine art to music, but theirs is the writing to which I aspire. Wikipedia has an interesting, though I suspect elementary, article on plagiarism. There is even a section on "self-plagiarism" which could be an issue if one has assigned the rights to his own work to someone else. So far, I have only showcased my work here at Poetry Magnum Opus, not elsewhere. That said, I will rip off my own work as much as I please and with impunity. Now, you all have your own recognizable styles. Who are your influences and to what degree do you emulate them? Disclose. Don't hold back. View full record
  2. For the longest time I have wanted to read a specific poem from which, to date, I have only been able to read a few verses. The first two verses of the poem are included in a book I have about meter. Though I have searched online, I have not been able to find the poem reproduced in its entirety anywhere. I am super excited to report that yesterday I had occasion to re-visit an institution from which I have been estranged for decades: the public library. I obtained a library card and borrowed three books. The books are, of course, from the poetry section, and one of them is a collection which includes the poem I have wanted to read. The collection is called Touch (The University of Chicago Press, Chicago/Faber and Faber Limited, London, 1967) by Thom Gunn , and the poem I have been looking for is called "Pierce Street." My latest publication here at Poetry Magnum Opus is an aubade called "Vintages." It begins Brown sunlight creeps through slats, around/edges and tans her naked shoulder ... I am considering the possibility that I was influenced, subconsciously, by the first lines of "Pierce Street" where Gunn writes, ... Long threads of sunlight slant/Past curtains, blind, and slat ... " I would not deny or try to hide influence from anyone. To the contrary, I have wanted to share "Pierce Street" in PMO's A Poem I Read Today forum for several years, and now that I have the complete poem available to me, I can even use it as an example to expound upon this matter of influence. For the sake of example, take the words and image in the lines cited above from Gunn's "Pierce Street" and compare/contrast them with the requisite words and image in tonyv's "Vintages." Both are talking about window dressings, about daylight making its way into a room. There are two words in common: "sunlight" and "slat(s)." But I will posit that that is where the similarities end. "Vintages" is an aubade, whereas "Pierce Street" is something else. I found it uncanny that in a part of "Pierce Street" which I had not read when I wrote "Vintages," Gunn wrote, Out of night now the flesh-tint starts to dawn. When composing "Vintages" I searched for a while for a word or expression to convey "flesh-tint" and settled on "tans her naked shoulder." I wonder had I read all of "Pierce Street" before I wrote "Vintages" would I have subconsciously pilfered "flesh-tint"? Probably not. I considered "tints" on my own and chose "tans." I am drawn to the works of poets from several eras, one of which includes Edgar Bowers and Thom Gunn. Both were students of Stanford University's Yvor Winters. It is their writing, their style which attracts me. To some degree it is the subject matter of their poems, but mostly it is their use of contemporary language in metrical verse. From other schools I admire Larkin and the loveliness of Tuckerman. I have other sources of inspiration from fine art to music, but theirs is the writing to which I aspire. Wikipedia has an interesting, though I suspect elementary, article on plagiarism. There is even a section on "self-plagiarism" which could be an issue if one has assigned the rights to his own work to someone else. So far, I have only showcased my work here at Poetry Magnum Opus, not elsewhere. That said, I will rip off my own work as much as I please and with impunity. Now, you all have your own recognizable styles. Who are your influences and to what degree do you emulate them? Disclose. Don't hold back.
  3. Love the new cover photo.   I never did understand the first one, the rusty bridge.  But this new one seem more welcoming. 

    1. tonyv

      tonyv

      Hey, the rusty bridge had character...and graffiti! :biggrin: It's on the bike path. :wink: But I'm glad you like the new one. :-8)

  4. tonyv

    New forum software options/features

    Are you tired of your display name? Prefer to be called ShakesPEAR instead of PiNkPoEt? If so, you can change it in your Account Settings options.
  5. tonyv

    lack of activity

    YarnSpinner, the last post here (2016) would be in this topic, as there have many posts all over the site since then. I don't think any member is keeping track of members' skills in some judgemental way. Everyone who posts here is at his own level and shares poems in his own style, whatever he's into. These are fascinating hobbies. My father is from your generation, and he also has had similar hobbies. Growing up and throughout my whole life I have been fortunate to have been exposed to much of these what I would characterize as "old school" pastimes: leather work, wood burning, woodwork, black and white photography, weaving, and many other similar albeit obscure crafts. I agree. I've said it many times to those who complain the loudest about a lack of activity: if you want activity, create it. Everyone posts as much as he is willing or able, no pressure. The same goes for me. Though sometimes participation may seem like a solitary experience when replies are few and far between, the poems/topics will continue being read (perhaps replied to) days, weeks, months, or even years later. As far as I'm concerned, as it is often said, this is the internet, and once it's out there, it's there to stay. Let's continue to get it out there.
  6. tonyv

    Answers to Unasked Questions

    While some sites do, I generally do not "prune" (i.e. delete) inactive members or topics. You could try reaching out to any member using the private conversation feature. The inactive member might receive an email notification of your private message. Completely vanished from the online world -- that's not a good a sign. While I wouldn't include someone without actually knowing, perhaps an "in memoriam" topic or forum would be in order ...
  7. tonyv

    Queen of the River

    I would be interested in learning what your specific hopes for "Snow Storm" were/are. That would help me to offer relevant thoughts re this poem. I'll start by saying the narrative is very entertaining. I love the personification, and the story almost has a ghost story effect. It kept my interest from start to finish, and I enjoyed the vernacular. As for setting it to music, how would you like it to turn out? You've already proven that a poem can be set to music ("Snow Storm"), but is that what you would like to do, namely set a poem to music? Or do you want a song? I don't have any training in composition, but I do love music, and as I've understood it, songs (especially in popular music) adhere to a structure, usually something like verse/verse/chorus/verse/chorus/bridge/chorus. That's not entirely accurate, but it's something like that, and I'm using it for illustrative purposes. I would love to write a song and designate it for a favorite artist. Were I to try that, I would first choose an artist or group of artists (for better chances of success) whom to target. Then I would write a poem from which I would extract the best parts and dumb it down to lyrics which would fit the frame (verse/chorus, etc) of a song depending on my chosen genre of music. I play some guitar, and I would try to come up with a hook for the song and maybe compose an underlying melody. Then I would submit it to professionals. I'm out of time, but I hope to this week choose a song I like and present it in an article along with a link to a youtube clip of the song. I'll try to explain why I like the song, why I think it works as a song. I'm not sure if this reply helps. I'd really like to know if it's at least pointing in the right direction. Tony
  8. tonyv

    SNOW STORM

    YarnSpinner, I am beyond excited that you've shared this here! Songwriting, specifically composing and music theory, is something I wish I had formal training in, or at least knew a lot more about. From our backchannel discussion, I think I understood that you wrote this poem (the lyrics) and had it set to music by professional musicians. It would be great if you could elaborate a bit more on how you did that, the steps you had to take in order to get it done and to secure your rights. I'm fascinated that the musician was able to use the poem as you wrote it, that he was able to set it to music without regard to specific form. The poem reads like a ballad, and I would characterize the song as a ballad, but it's not written in typical "ballad" meter. I would love to see what a musician can do with a sonnet, or at least with some iambic pentameter. Song lyrics aren't held to the same high standards as poetry because a song has something else to carry it: the music. Therefore, most songs' lyrics can hardly stand alone as poems, even if they're they're very good, very poetic. "Snow Storm" is well composed, in every sense. I added the mp3 audio file (in red) to your post. I encourage everyone to check it out, give it a listen and read along. Thank you again for this topic, for sharing this undertaking, this terrific composition here at Poetry Magnum Opus. Tony
  9. tonyv

    Trey

    I'm sorry, Judi. I'm without comment on this one. Tony
  10. tonyv

    The Shaking

    A worthy work to bump this Resurrection weekend. Nice to see you, Joel. Tony
  11. tonyv

    Cliff Face

    Significant improvements in the second verse. I do question whether there should be a comma after "turnip fields." If not, perhaps "when" in L4 should be "then." I like how you've changed the smiles in S3 to manic cracked grins, and I can't get enough of before their sadness/descended into the sea. I love that. Tony
  12. tonyv

    At The Launderette

    Some subtle but effective changes in the first revision. (I say first because I know you're always revising!) Aunt Evie seems likable to me. Tony
  13. tonyv

    "The Lady doth . . . "

    Judi, I know you, and you have clearly done well for yourself. I think you're proof that everyone is not as easily susceptible as many would claim. Good use of the sonnet form. Now, if only some attractive women, ages 18-80 would make inappropriate advances toward me. I present my knee ... Tony
  14. tonyv

    Saturday Morning

    I, too, like the third stanza. It adds profundity to the picture that would otherwise resemble a still life. Tony
  15. tonyv

    Memory Lane

    This is lyrical, lovely. I totally get the nostalgia. I would drop the last line; I think that part has already been expressed, shown in the penultimate line. Tony
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