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tonyv

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About tonyv

  • Birthday 08/14/1970

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    Rhode Island

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  1. Happy Year of the Dog

    Thank you! My birth year was year of the dog. Tony
  2. Sunshine Girl

    Judi, I was delighted when I discovered that the seasons correspond to the various eras of the speakers life. The last verse gets me down a bit; I prefer to focus on the nostalgia. Tony
  3. A New Morning

    The locale is exotic and appealing. This is very nice work, and she should love this, Joel. (Not to mention, you love her more than coffee, and that says a lot, lol!) Tony PS -- I love "bluish morning."
  4. Vintages

    Thanks, Joel. I figured I'd get specific. Didn't want to use glass/glasses twice in a short poem. Tony
  5. Without a Compass

    Some strong edits in the first stanza. I liked "winter cold," but "shivers" turns it into action. Major improvement with the end stops in S1L4. You made some subtle improvements in stanza three that native English speakers will detect. The English language is rich, and ever-so-slight shifts in expression can impart differences in meaning. Tony
  6. Can You Hear Them?

    Another nice example of a form that uses one of my favorite devices when used well: repetition. Tony
  7. Let the Games Begin

    Have they begun?!? I'm seeing some buzz, but I'm kind of out of it, so I don't know if they're actually underway. I tried the link for the septolet and got an error message. Not sure why... Tony
  8. Vintages

    Thanks, Phil. I like that, too. I think there are some layers just in that line: he reaches for the glass, not for her; he reaches for the glass and for her; etc. Tony
  9. Vintages

    I'm trying, Judi, I'm trying! Tony
  10. I recently finished listening to a "Poetry Podcast," available at the website for The New Yorker, called "How Do You Fact-Check a Poem?" It features a fact-checker for The New Yorker. I wasn't aware that publications had fact-checkers for poetry. I do a lot of fact checking whenever I work on a poem. Many of my poems involve geography, and I want to make sure that my geographical references are accurate. Fact checking is important to me, and I want to save myself the embarrassment that would come from getting directions, longitudes and latitudes, weather and seasons, or flora and fauna wrong. For example, in my recent poem "Vintages," I mention that elsewhere, where it is summer, clusters of grapes are growing and await their harvesting. Though I did not expressly declare it in the poem, the speaker is in the Northern Hemisphere where, tonight, the temperature will drop to 20F (-6.6C). However, Argentina is at the height of summer, and the temperature there is currently 99F (37.2C). Yes, grapes are growing right now in the Southern Hemisphere from which the next vintage will yield! I have written other poems where a discrepancy would be even more apparent and it was even more important to me that geographical references made sense. In my poem "Prudhoe Bay," I make reference to the north pole; I refer to it as "ninety degrees north." I had to look into that to make sure that that actually is the coordinate for the north pole, and it is; zero degrees would be the equator. There have been several other instances where it has mattered to me a great deal that my facts, geographical and others, were expressed correctly. Then there is the matter of artistic license. Sometimes it is possible to get so bogged down with fact that one loses sight of the art and its message. In my poem "Goodbye," I was dealing with what seemed like chronological inconsistency, and I could not decide on past versus present tense in a part of the poem. An esteemed PMO member, @Benjamin, reminded me that, "Yes I think this poem works fine in the present tense with the chronological issues you stated -- 'it is poetry after all' -- and the appreciative reader still requires the courtesy of having a little imaginative work to do ... " I appreciated this help very much, and it comes to mind whenever I start to get overly bogged down with facts while composing a poem. Do you fact check when writing poetry? To what extent? View full record
  11. I recently finished listening to a "Poetry Podcast," available at the website for The New Yorker, called "How Do You Fact-Check a Poem?" It features a fact-checker for The New Yorker. I wasn't aware that publications had fact-checkers for poetry. I do a lot of fact checking whenever I work on a poem. Many of my poems involve geography, and I want to make sure that my geographical references are accurate. Fact checking is important to me, and I want to save myself the embarrassment that would come from getting directions, longitudes and latitudes, weather and seasons, or flora and fauna wrong. For example, in my recent poem "Vintages," I mention that elsewhere, where it is summer, clusters of grapes are growing and await their harvesting. Though I did not expressly declare it in the poem, the speaker is in the Northern Hemisphere where, tonight, the temperature will drop to 20F (-6.6C). However, Argentina is at the height of summer, and the temperature there is currently 99F (37.2C). Yes, grapes are growing right now in the Southern Hemisphere from which the next vintage will yield! I have written other poems where a discrepancy would be even more apparent and it was even more important to me that geographical references made sense. In my poem "Prudhoe Bay," I make reference to the north pole; I refer to it as "ninety degrees north." I had to look into that to make sure that that actually is the coordinate for the north pole, and it is; zero degrees would be the equator. There have been several other instances where it has mattered to me a great deal that my facts, geographical and others, were expressed correctly. Then there is the matter of artistic license. Sometimes it is possible to get so bogged down with fact that one loses sight of the art and its message. In my poem "Goodbye," I was dealing with what seemed like chronological inconsistency, and I could not decide on past versus present tense in a part of the poem. An esteemed PMO member, @Benjamin, reminded me that, "Yes I think this poem works fine in the present tense with the chronological issues you stated -- 'it is poetry after all' -- and the appreciative reader still requires the courtesy of having a little imaginative work to do ... " I appreciated this help very much, and it comes to mind whenever I start to get overly bogged down with facts while composing a poem. Do you fact check when writing poetry? To what extent?
  12. Vintages

    Thank you, Judi. Complexity in simplicity is nice. This is my first attempt at an aubade, but I figure it's not necessary for every aubade to be called "Aubade." Tony
  13. Vintages

    Brown sunlight creeps through slats, around edges, and tans her naked shoulder. The smudged stemware on last night's table observes his restlessness. Away, where summer lingers, clusters droop and await patiently the harvest. He reaches for a glass. She lets him.
  14. Homage to Romance

    And a very accessible aubade it is! The three individual tankas aggregate nicely into a lyrical whole. Tony
  15. Self-Portrait 101

    Thank you, Dave. I considered losing the italics, and now with some reassurement I'm inclined to do just that. With appreciation, Tony
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