tonyv

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About tonyv

  • Birthday 08/14/1970

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    Rhode Island

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  1. Nostalgic and tight. An intriguing perspective, Barry. Tony
  2. Terrific work, Phil. Of course, I remember "Cafe" -- I love it -- and "Oils" was also very much to my liking. Tony
  3. Phil, these are lovely entries. I just got through mentioning on Tinker's blog how I prefer short poems, and here you've presented three that are very much to my liking. Tony
  4. I prefer lyrical verse, and the sonnet is at the top of my list of favorite forms. I also happen to prefer short poems. Most people would probably agree that the sonnet is a short form, but when it comes to my own writing a sonnet is about as long as it gets; the longest poems I've written have been sonnets. Plenty of them have been Rainis Sonnets which purists may not consider to be sonnets at all, but I tend to characterize many poems that aren't exactly sonnets as sonnet-like. The Rainis sonnet happens to fit my own lyrical meditations very well. Tony
  5. First, let me say I very much like your poem and how it's presented, the way it looks on the page with the accompanying artwork (photo/image). The most striking part for me is how the speaker observes that, " ... he would have come while we were eating." The sense of loss is always heightened with the realization that something solemn like the passing of a living thing has taken place while one was occupied with the mundane, with something trivial. I've always insisted that companion media pieces enhance the entire presentation of a poem, especially on a web page. I've included images with several of my own works, and I've seen others do it, too. Including an image certainly doesn't take away from a well crafted poem. It's like with album art. When a music lover buys an album, it's clearly about the music, but the album usually comes with extras: cover art, lyrics, etc. All of it is a tangible package like a book. You can hold it. But here's where my view differs with that of some others. Some people think poems are better in a book than on a web page. Yes, I still love books, but I don't love a well-crafted poem any more or any less whether it's presented in a manuscript, bound in a book, or displayed on a web page. Keats' "Bright Star" is exactly the same no matter the media ... with one exception. Though I love to hear a poem read out loud, I think it's incomplete if it's solely recited without the benefit of seeing the words/lines/stanzas, how they look in writing. Hearing a poem read (or reading it out loud myself) with the written work in front of me offers me the best of all worlds. I'm very much a proponent of artistic license, and I'm not such a fan of popular dogma or trendy limitations placed on art. Artistic license is yet another tool that enhances a work of art, even makes art art. Take a look at some lovely examples of naive art. What kind of a boring know-it-all would insist that Henry Rousseau's "The Repast of the Lion" is flawed because of inconsistencies in flora and fauna? Or that Juego de Domino's " The Domino Players" should be revised because it's unlikely a rooster would be present at a game of dominoes? That said, most of the time I do strive for accuracy in my own poems and do a lot of research when composing a poem. For example, I use a lot of geographical references, and in most cases, deviation from facts would only serve to confuse the reader. I try to keep it factual when deviation would serve no artistic purpose. On the other hand, in a recent topic I had expressed concern over my preferred use of the present tense toward the end of the poem when past tense might have made more factual sense. Our member Geoff kindly addressed the issue in a way that made me feel good about my preferred choice of present tense: "Yes I think this poem works fine in the present tense with the chronological issues you stated -- 'it is poetry after all' -- and the appreciative reader still requires the courtesy of having a little imaginative work to do ... " He has helped me out with his thoughtful replies other times where I have been bogged down by similar issues by reminding me of poetic license. In the referenced Rousseau painting, botany is not the point of the artwork, rather the take-away is something more profound. As for your poem, there is nothing that would make me presume that you imagined the incident, that the facts were off because it didn't happen and you wrote it without research without being able to back up the part about "exotic." This isn't to take away from the poster's comment; he knows about birds, and it perplexes him, but I think he's looking into it more than the average reader. Knowing nothing about birds, it's a non-issue for me why or in what way the bird was "exotic." It just was. Tony
  6. I enjoyed the progression and lyrical characteristics of this piece, how the the speaker asks the question and how the poet leaves it unanswered for the reader. The speaker doesn't know the answer, neither does the reader, nor should he. Also striking is that Finlay held a mirror "with his face turned away." That image says a lot. For some reason it causes me to make an association with a line ("She has drawn her hands away") from a lovely poem by Hart Crane called "A Persuasion." Slightly different subject matter, almost similar texture and mood. And I, as Tinker did, liked "rehearse this senseless grief." Nice submission, Barry. Tony
  7. Judi, The members here at PMO and non-member visitors to this site are fortunate to have the rich catalogue of resources you have compiled in the Poetry Magnum Opus REFERENCE SECTION at their disposal. I refer to it myself from time to time when I want to brush up on and see examples of a particular type of sonnet I would like to try. A few that appeal to me are the Wyatt/Surrey Sonnet, the Blank Verse Sonnet, and of course my favorite, of which I have written several, the Rainis Sonnet. Yes, "Poetry stirs the emotions as much by the manner of delivery as the message." Poetry is more than a story, and it's more than a diary entry. As is often pointed out to beginners, a diary entry makes the writer feel something, a poem makes the reader feel something. It comes down to the soul and intellect you mention, the emotion/passion and craftsmanship that makes a poem. Poetry is the highest form of language. I, too, am a student and by no means an authority. I have no formal training when it comes to writing; I'm self-taught. Thank you for your hard work and for sharing it with me and others. Tony
  8. Welcome to the Poetry Magnum Opus Front Page where I hope to feature quality articles and other content of interest. Start by checking out the Blogs. Visit Tinker's Blog where Judi Van Gorder, the PMO Administrator who has painstakingly built the popular Poetry Magnum Opus REFERENCE SECTION resource, can showcase Reference Section topics of interest and other matters she may deem relevant and desirable to highlight. Also check out the PMO Members' Promotional Blog where PMO members may promote their published works, themselves, and their other artistic pursuits receiving comments from PMO members and non-members alike. Of course, the heart of PMO is and always will be the PMO Forums where members showcase and archive their works and interact with each other. Access these components from the menu bar above. Tõnis Veenpere aka tonyv
  9. Welcome to the Poetry Magnum Opus Front Page where I hope to feature quality articles and other content of interest. Start by checking out the Blogs. Visit Tinker's Blog where Judi Van Gorder, the PMO Administrator who has painstakingly built the popular Poetry Magnum Opus REFERENCE SECTION resource, can showcase Reference Section topics of interest and other matters she may deem relevant and desirable to highlight. Also check out the PMO Members' Promotional Blog where PMO members may promote their published works, themselves, and their other artistic pursuits receiving comments from PMO members and non-members alike. Of course, the heart of PMO is and always will be the PMO Forums where members showcase and archive their works and interact with each other. Access these components from the menu bar above. Tõnis Veenpere aka tonyv View full record
  10. I downloaded and saved the PDF file. I like your entry. It says a lot in just two lines. I especially like how the title flows naturally into the poem. Tony
  11. Soy Burger in Paradise, Judi? You're making me hungry! As you know, I've been tightening up my own poems, too. I want them to look good in their respective topics! Tony I'm no Parrothead, not exactly a fan, but okay, here you go:
  12. A hometown hero, Barry? I had to google her, but it seems there has been an artistic tribute, a mural dedicated to her: Hull mural honours trawler safety fighter Lillian Bilocca Your poem is a lovely literary tribute to her. Tony
  13. An intriguing lyric right out of a dreamy antiquity. I particularly liked "delicate wrist" and fruit/salute. Tony
  14. Thank you. "Be" in L6 isn't an especially strong verb, but it is significant to the poem and the message, and I'm thinking another verb in L4 might just overpower it. I'm still keeping my mind open to the options. With appreciation, Tony
  15. This is a group blog. All PMO members who want to promote and solicit comments on their published works may add to it when they have something to promote. Simply add your latest entry to the blog. Include relevant information (your name or screen name, poem title, periodical name, hyperlink to the site where published, etc). If you have a lot of them and feel you need your own blog, let me know, and I will try to accommodate you. Members are encouraged to continue also posting their promotional topics in the Promotions forum on the board itself which is better suited for archiving your promotions. Please exercise care when editing and updating this Blog. Be careful not to modify or delete others' entries. Latest blog entries and comments will appear on "The PMO Front Page."