Tinker

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  1. Love it! When I haven't been writing and I really want to get back to it even in a small way, I resort to haiku.... at least it is something. I love the Cinquains especially the 2nd one. Statue of St Francis governs in my garden, hummingbirds, bees and butterflies welcome Not exactly as thought provoking as yours but when inspired - write.(even if it is a little poem.) ~~Tink
  2. I hadn't brought this up to date and you couldn't be left out. Yes we have lost a couple permanently but their memory remains as does their poetry. As a matter of fact a couple of others we think have passed also but have been unable to verify. A lot of poets here have come and moved on in one way or another. There are a couple in this series of limericks that I actually don't remember.
  3. Byron's Sonnet is a sonnet form named from George Gordon, Lord Byron's attempts at expanding the rhyme from 2 to 3 rhymes in the octave of the Italian or Petrarchan Sonnet. The elements of Byron's Sonnet are: a quatorzain made up of an octave followed by a sestet. metric, iambic pentameter. rhymed, rhyme scheme abba acca dedede pivot or volta between the octave and sestet. Sonnet to Chillon by Lord Byron Eternal spirit of the chainless mind! Brightest in dungeons, Liberty! thou art, For there thy habitation is the heart, The heart which love of thee alone can bind; And when thy sons to fetters are consigned To fetters, and the damp vault's dayless gloom, Their country conquers with their martyrdom, And Freedom's fame finds wings on every wind. Chillon! thy prison is a holy place, And thy sad floor an altar, for 'twas trod, Until his very steps have left a trace Worn, as if thy cold pavement were a sod, By Bonnivard! - May none those marks efface! For they appeal from tyranny to God.
  4. Hi David, I keep coming back to this and find it almost eirry. . i can see the cross armed librarian impatiently waiting for the kids to be picked up,so she can put things in order and close up. Like Tony I've not been inside a library for a long time although I've picked up a grandchild from the library where she went with the pretext of working on a school project with a a friend but in reality as an excuse to just hang out with several. It turned out not much work got accomplished. I hope the kids weren't too disruptive. Too me libraries were always silent vaults and I was afraid I was going make a sound that would echo throughout and angry stares would be directed toward me. Interesting how imagery can bring forth emotions long forgotten. I am sure more will surface as come back again and again. ~~Tink
  5. Haiku Journal 2017 jvg # 18 invisible cells hold ancestors DNA my blood in two vials
  6. To Rhyme or Not to Rhyme Many poets today believe rhyme is old fashioned, artificial or strained. Rhyme has a long history in verse which dates back to before the written word. Stories of love, war, gods and heroes were told through oral traditions and often rhyme was used to assist memory in order that the tale could be passed on. Since the written word language has evolved and rhyme has become more sophisticated than just a tool for communication, it has become an art form. Still in much of today's poetry, rhyme has been dismissed or relegated to light verse. However, the modern day rapper shows us that rhyme with the right rhythm, can be timely, dynamic and powerful. Rhyme is "the one chord we have added to the Greek lyre." Oscar Wilde It is all about sonics. There are many variations of "rhyme", which basically is the echo of sound, a melodic link between words most often at the end of the line. The ancient Welsh in their strict code of meters, taught that to prevent the "main" rhyme from overpowering the line, it should be balanced by "harmony of sound", and encouraged the use of alliteration, consonance, assonance, internal rhyme and more, all forms of rhyme A poem doesn't have to be end rhymed but I listen for "harmony of sound" in every poem I read. Rhyme Variables aicill rhyme (Commonly used in Celtic verse forms.) According to the NPEOPP aicill rhyme is simply rhyming an end word of one line with a word somewhere early in the next line. Robin Skelton's Shapes of our Singing takes it a step further and states aicill rhyme occurs when the end word of the first line is disyllabic. An on-line source describing Gaelic pronunciation takes it even a step further describing aicill rhyme as occuring when the last stressed syllable of an end word rhymes with the next to last unstressed word in the next line with no mention that the end word need by disyllabic. (Gaelic examples I've been able to find seem to support all 3 definitions, of course I can't really hear the stressed/unstressed definition but one example appeared as if the internal rhyme could be unstressed by the position in the line and the words around it.) alliteration (from Latin al litera- to letter) The echoed beginning sound of a stressed syllable with the beginning sound of another stressed syllable in close proximity within the line. Strictly used, it should be the stressed syllable of successive words in a line, most commonly repeated consonants that phonetically match e.g. Little ladies like lovely Lillys or Center for Secret Sisters. However beginning vowel sounds most always alliterate e.g The ant eater entered the exit. alternate rhyme Rhyme pattern within a stanza, end rhyme change every other line. abab cdcd etc or ababab cdcdcd etc or abababab cdcdcdcd etc . assonance A rhetorical device in which vowel sounds are repeated regardless of the consonants before and after. In English this is usually within a line but in other cultures, Welsh and Spanish in particular this can be between internal or end words of different lines. broken rhyme Breaking an end word to create rhyme with another line. eg. Breaking the word heartbreak carrying the "break" to the next line so that heart can rhyme with part. caesura rhyme Couplet rhymed at the caesura mid line and alternating at the end of the line as if an alternate rhymed quatrain abab is written as a couplet. caudate rhyme Same as tail rhyme, the short line at the end of the stanza rhymes with another short line within the stanza, with longer lines in between. chain rhyme Rhyme pattern within a stanza, interlocking rhyme that links one stanza to the next. Such as in the Terza Rima rhyme aba bcb cdc etc. There are various chain techniques with a long history climbing or step rhyme rhyme that moves in or out one syllable per line, the pattern is at the discretion of the poet x x x a x x a x x a x x a x x x x a x x x x a x consonance, imperfect rhyme / near rhyme, oblique rhyme / off rhyme / slant rhyme Echoed consonant sounds but different vowel sounds as in season and raisin or sometimes only the last consonant sound such as fame and room. This is a simplified meaning, definitions of consonance or slant rhyme seem to wander all over the place. For a more complicated definition see "consonate". also slant rhyme. "He whispered into the dark, dank heart of the night" The prominent and repeated "d" "t" and "k" sounds are consonance. consonant rhyme Same consonant sound at either the beginning of the lines (head rhyme) or the last consonant at the end of the line (common in Celtic and Spanish verse). cross rhyme When the end word rhymes with a word in the middle of the next line. This comes from the old long hemistiched couplets in which rhyme occurs (ab)(ba): L1 xxxa,xxxb L2 xxxb,xxxa. NPEOPP. double rhyme When both syllables of a 2 syllable word rhyme with both syllables of another 2 syllable word. e.g. dapper / rapper dunadh Beginning and ending the poem with the same syllable, word or line bringing the poem full circle. (A defining feature of ancient Celtic poetry.) envelope rhyme Rhyme pattern within a stanza, rhyme enclosed within a stanza. e.g. abba or abccba or abcddcba. exact / full / identical ordinary / perfect/ strict / true rhyme The echo of vowel and consonant sounds, in English rhyme occurs between stressed syllables. bait / wait, begin / sin, syllable / laughable eye or sight rhyme Rhyme that has the same spelling but sound differently. e.g. laughter / daughter idea/flea feminine rhyme A rhyme of 2 or more syllables in which the stress is on other than the last syllable such as moral / quarrel or healthiest / wealthiest framed rhyme or para-rhyme Consonance occurring front and back of the word. back/bike boat/bait half rhyme Feminine or three-syllable words in which the initial stressed syllables rhyme but not the unstressed syllables e.g. clingy / singing head rhyme When rhyme appears at the beginning of the line in the first word or syllable rather than at the end of the line. head and tail rhyme First and last, usually referring to the first and last word in a line are rhymed. identity rhyme / rime riche / rich rhyme Ordinary rhyme beginning a step backward. The sounds start being matched before the last stressed vowel. All 3 sounds of the syllable are echoed in rich rhyme, as in foul/fowl as compared to ordinary rhyme growl/fowl. Rich rhyme, often called rime riche or identity rhyme is more commonly used in French prosody than in English. interlaced rhyme A word in the middle of one line rhymes with a word in the middle of another. internal rhyme A word within a line rhymes with another word within the line whether or not it is at the end of the line. Leonine rhyme A line written with 2 syllable rhyme midway and at the end of the line. Originally employed to rhyme at a midway caesura and line end, found in ancient Latin writing. "They took some honey and plenty of money."---- Edward Lear, Owl and the Pussycat. light rhyme The rhyming of a stressed syllable with an unstressed syllable, like some / ransom masculine rhyme Rhyme in a 1 syllable word or on the accented last syllable of a multi syllable word. mono-rhyme Rhyme pattern, single rhyme within a verse or stanza. aaaaaaa or stanza aaaa bbbb cccc etc. Nursery rhyme Rhymed verse meant for children. reverse rhyme Echoed sounds of the first consonant and stressed vowel but not the last consonant. bat / back sectional rhyme Internal rhyme within the line. e.g.:she'd be his wife, his life in song. spelling rhyme End words that have similar spelling but don't rhyme. move/love . tail rhyme In a stanza of long lines, the last line is shorter and is rhymed with one other line within the stanza which is also shorter. triple rhyme words that rhyme in 3 syllables eg mystery / history . tumbling rhyme Mono-rhymed lines until the rhyme runs out of energy then the lines switch to a new mono-rhymed series.
  7. To Rhyme or Not to Rhyme

    Many poets today believe rhyme is old fashioned, artificial or strained.  Rhyme has a long history in verse which dates back to before the written word.  Stories of love, war, gods and heroes were told through oral traditions and often rhyme was used to assist memory in order that the tale could be passed on.  Since the written word language has evolved and rhyme has become more sophisticated than just a tool for communication, it has become an art form.  Still in much of today's poetry, rhyme has been dismissed or relegated to light verse.  Still, the modern day rapper shows us that rhyme with the right rhythm, can be timely, dynamic and powerful. 

    Rhyme is "the one chord we have added to the Greek lyre."  Oscar Wilde  It is all about sonics.  There are many variations of "rhyme", which basically is the echo of sound, a melodic link between words most often at the end of the line.  The ancient Welsh in their strict code of meters, taught that to prevent the "main" rhyme from overpowering the line, it should be balanced by  "harmony of sound",  and encouraged the use of alliteration, consonance, assonance, internal rhyme and more, all forms of rhyme

    A poem doesn't have to be end rhymed but I listen for "harmony of sound" in every poem I read. 

    Rhyme Variables

    aicill rhyme  (Commonly used in Celtic verse forms.) According to the NPEOPP aicill rhyme is simply echoing the sound of an end word of one line with a word somewhere early in the next line. Robin Skelton's Shapes of our Singing takes it a step further and states aicill rhyme occurs when the end word of the first line is disyllabic. 
    alliteration  (from Latin al litera- to letter) The echoed beginning sound of a stressed syllable with the beginning sound of another stressed syllable in close proximity within the line.  Strictly used,  it should be the stressed syllable of successive words in a line, most commonly repeated consonants that phonetically match e.g. Little ladies like lovely Lillys or Center for Secret Sisters.  However beginning vowel sounds most always alliterate e.g The ant eater entered the exit.
     
    alternate rhyme Rhyme pattern within a stanza, end rhyme change every other line. abab cdcd etc or ababab cdcdcd etc or abababab cdcdcdcd etc . 
    assonance  A rhetorical device in which vowel sounds are repeated regardless of the consonants before and after. In English this is usually within a line but in other cultures, Welsh and Spanish in particular this can be between internal or end words of different lines.
     
    broken rhyme Breaking an end word to create rhyme with another line. eg. Breaking the word heartbreak carrying the "break" to the next line so that heart can rhyme with part.
     
    caesura rhyme Couplet rhymed at the caesura mid line and alternating at the end of the line as if an alternate rhymed quatrain abab is written as a couplet.
     
    caudate rhyme Same as tail rhyme, the short line at the end of the stanza rhymes with another short line within the stanza, with longer lines in between.
     
    chain rhyme Rhyme pattern within a stanza, interlocking rhyme that links one stanza to the next. Such as in the Terza Rima rhyme aba bcb cdc etc. There are various chain techniques with a long history
     
    consonance, imperfect rhyme / near rhyme, oblique rhyme / off rhyme / slant rhyme Echoed consonant sounds but different vowel sounds as in season and raisin or sometimes only the last consonant sound such as fame and room. This is a simplified meaning, definitions of consonance or slant rhyme seem to wander all over the place. For a more complicated definition see "consonate". also slant rhyme. "He whispered into the dark, dank heart of the night" The prominent and repeated "d" "t" and "k" sounds are consonance.
     
    consonant rhyme Same consonant sound at either the beginning of the lines (head rhyme) or the last consonant at the end of the line (common in Celtic and Spanish verse).
     
    cross rhyme When the end word rhymes with a word in the middle of the next line. This comes from the old long hemistiched couplets in which rhyme occurs (ab)(ba): L1 xxxa,xxxb L2 xxxb,xxxa. NPEOPP.
     
    double rhyme When both syllables of a 2 syllable word rhyme with both syllables of another 2 syllable word. e.g. dapper / rapper
     
    dunadh Beginning and ending the poem with the same syllable, word or line bringing the poem full circle. (A defining feature of ancient Celtic poetry.) 
     
    envelope rhyme Rhyme pattern within a stanza, rhyme enclosed within a stanza. e.g. abba or abccba or abcddcba.
     
    exact / full / identical ordinary / perfect/ strict / true rhyme The echo of vowel and consonant sounds, in English rhyme occurs between stressed syllables.     bait / wait, begin / sin,  syllable / laughable
    eye or sight rhyme Rhyme that has the same spelling but sound differently. e.g. laughter / daughter idea/flea
     
    feminine rhyme

    A rhyme of 2 or more syllables in which the stress is on other than the last syllable such as
    moral / quarrel or healthiest / wealthiest

    framed rhyme or para-rhyme Consonance occurring front and back of the word. back/bike  boat/bait
     
    half rhyme Feminine or three-syllable words in which the initial stressed syllables rhyme but not the unstressed syllables e.g. clingy / singing
     
    head rhyme When rhyme appears at the beginning of the line in the first word or syllable rather than at the end of the line.
    head and tail rhyme First and last, usually referring to the first and last word in a line are rhymed.
     
    identity rhyme / rime riche /  rich rhyme Ordinary rhyme beginning a step backward. The sounds start being matched before the last stressed vowel. All 3 sounds of the syllable are echoed in rich rhyme, as in foul/fowl as compared to ordinary rhyme growl/fowl. Rich rhyme, often called rime riche or identity rhyme is more commonly used in French prosody than in English.
    interlaced rhyme A word in the middle of one line rhymes with a word in the middle of another.
     
    internal rhyme A word within a line rhymes with another word within the line whether or not it is at the end of the line.
    Leonine rhyme A line written with 2 syllable rhyme midway and at the end of the line. Originally employed to rhyme at a midway caesura and line end, found in ancient Latin writing. "They took some honey and plenty of money."---- Edward Lear, Owl and the Pussycat.
     
    light rhyme The rhyming of a stressed syllable with an unstressed syllable, like some / ransom
     
    masculine rhyme Rhyme in a 1 syllable word or on the accented last syllable of a multi syllable word.
     
    mono-rhyme Rhyme pattern, single rhyme within a verse or stanza. aaaaaaa or stanza aaaa bbbb cccc etc.
    Nursery rhyme Rhymed verse meant for children.
     
    reverse rhyme Echoed sounds of the first consonant and stressed vowel but not the last consonant.  bat / back
     
    sectional rhyme Internal rhyme within the line. e.g.:she'd be his wife, his life in song.
     
    spelling rhyme End words that have similar spelling but don't rhyme. move/love .
     
    tail rhyme In a stanza of long lines, the last line is shorter and is rhymed with one other line within the stanza which is also shorter.
     
    triple rhyme words that rhyme in 3 syllables eg mystery / history .
     
    tumbling rhyme Mono-rhymed lines until the rhyme runs out of energy then the lines switch to a new mono-rhymed series.  

     

  8. To Rhyme or Not to Rhyme Many poets today believe rhyme is old fashioned, artificial or strained. Rhyme has a long history in verse which dates back to before the written word. Stories of love, war, gods and heroes were told through oral traditions and often rhyme was used to assist memory in order that the tale could be passed on. Since the written word language has evolved and rhyme has become more sophisticated than just a tool for communication, it has become an art form. Still in much of today's poetry, rhyme has been dismissed or relegated to light verse. However, the modern day rapper shows us that rhyme with the right rhythm, can be timely, dynamic and powerful. Rhyme is "the one chord we have added to the Greek lyre." Oscar Wilde It is all about sonics. There are many variations of "rhyme", which basically is the echo of sound, a melodic link between words most often at the end of the line. The ancient Welsh in their strict code of meters, taught that to prevent the "main" rhyme from overpowering the line, it should be balanced by "harmony of sound", and encouraged the use of alliteration, consonance, assonance, internal rhyme and more, all forms of rhyme A poem doesn't have to be end rhymed but I listen for "harmony of sound" in every poem I read. Rhyme Variables aicill rhyme (Commonly used in Celtic verse forms.) According to the NPEOPP aicill rhyme is simply rhyming an end word of one line with a word somewhere early in the next line. Robin Skelton's Shapes of our Singing takes it a step further and states aicill rhyme occurs when the end word of the first line is disyllabic. An on-line source describing Gaelic pronunciation takes it even a step further describing aicill rhyme as occuring when the last stressed syllable of an end word rhymes with the next to last unstressed word in the next line with no mention that the end word need by disyllabic. (Gaelic examples I've been able to find seem to support all 3 definitions, of course I can't really hear the stressed/unstressed definition but one example appeared as if the internal rhyme could be unstressed by the position in the line and the words around it.) alliteration (from Latin al litera- to letter) The echoed beginning sound of a stressed syllable with the beginning sound of another stressed syllable in close proximity within the line. Strictly used, it should be the stressed syllable of successive words in a line, most commonly repeated consonants that phonetically match e.g. Little ladies like lovely Lillys or Center for Secret Sisters. However beginning vowel sounds most always alliterate e.g The ant eater entered the exit. alternate rhyme Rhyme pattern within a stanza, end rhyme change every other line. abab cdcd etc or ababab cdcdcd etc or abababab cdcdcdcd etc . assonance A rhetorical device in which vowel sounds are repeated regardless of the consonants before and after. In English this is usually within a line but in other cultures, Welsh and Spanish in particular this can be between internal or end words of different lines. broken rhyme Breaking an end word to create rhyme with another line. eg. Breaking the word heartbreak carrying the "break" to the next line so that heart can rhyme with part. caesura rhyme Couplet rhymed at the caesura mid line and alternating at the end of the line as if an alternate rhymed quatrain abab is written as a couplet. caudate rhyme Same as tail rhyme, the short line at the end of the stanza rhymes with another short line within the stanza, with longer lines in between. chain rhyme Rhyme pattern within a stanza, interlocking rhyme that links one stanza to the next. Such as in the Terza Rima rhyme aba bcb cdc etc. There are various chain techniques with a long history climbing rhyme or step rhyme rhyme that moves in or out one syllable per line, the pattern is at the discretion of the poet x x x a x x a x x a x x a x x x x a x x x x a x consonance, imperfect rhyme / near rhyme, oblique rhyme / off rhyme / slant rhyme Echoed consonant sounds but different vowel sounds as in season and raisin or sometimes only the last consonant sound such as fame and room. This is a simplified meaning, definitions of consonance or slant rhyme seem to wander all over the place. For a more complicated definition see "consonate". also slant rhyme. "He whispered into the dark, dank heart of the night" The prominent and repeated "d" "t" and "k" sounds are consonance. consonant rhyme Same consonant sound at either the beginning of the lines (head rhyme) or the last consonant at the end of the line (common in Celtic and Spanish verse). cross rhyme When the end word rhymes with a word in the middle of the next line. This comes from the old long hemistiched couplets in which rhyme occurs (ab)(ba): L1 xxxa,xxxb L2 xxxb,xxxa. NPEOPP. double rhyme When both syllables of a 2 syllable word rhyme with both syllables of another 2 syllable word. e.g. dapper / rapper dunadh Beginning and ending the poem with the same syllable, word or line bringing the poem full circle. (A defining feature of ancient Celtic poetry.) envelope rhyme Rhyme pattern within a stanza, rhyme enclosed within a stanza. e.g. abba or abccba or abcddcba. exact / full / identical ordinary / perfect/ strict / true rhyme The echo of vowel and consonant sounds, in English rhyme occurs between stressed syllables. bait / wait, begin / sin, syllable / laughable eye or sight rhyme Rhyme that has the same spelling but sound differently. e.g. laughter / daughter idea/flea feminine rhyme A rhyme of 2 or more syllables in which the stress is on other than the last syllable such as moral / quarrel or healthiest / wealthiest framed rhyme or para-rhyme Consonance occurring front and back of the word. back/bike boat/bait half rhyme Feminine or three-syllable words in which the initial stressed syllables rhyme but not the unstressed syllables e.g. clingy / singing head rhyme When rhyme appears at the beginning of the line in the first word or syllable rather than at the end of the line. head and tail rhyme First and last, usually referring to the first and last word in a line are rhymed. identity rhyme / rime riche / rich rhyme Ordinary rhyme beginning a step backward. The sounds start being matched before the last stressed vowel. All 3 sounds of the syllable are echoed in rich rhyme, as in foul/fowl as compared to ordinary rhyme growl/fowl. Rich rhyme, often called rime riche or identity rhyme is more commonly used in French prosody than in English. interlaced rhyme A word in the middle of one line rhymes with a word in the middle of another. internal rhyme A word within a line rhymes with another word within the line whether or not it is at the end of the line. Leonine rhyme A line written with 2 syllable rhyme midway and at the end of the line. Originally employed to rhyme at a midway caesura and line end, found in ancient Latin writing. "They took some honey and plenty of money."---- Edward Lear, Owl and the Pussycat. light rhyme The rhyming of a stressed syllable with an unstressed syllable, like some / ransom masculine rhyme Rhyme in a 1 syllable word or on the accented last syllable of a multi syllable word. mono-rhyme Rhyme pattern, single rhyme within a verse or stanza. aaaaaaa or stanza aaaa bbbb cccc etc. Nursery rhyme Rhymed verse meant for children. reverse rhyme Echoed sounds of the first consonant and stressed vowel but not the last consonant. bat / back sectional rhyme Internal rhyme within the line. e.g.:she'd be his wife, his life in song. spelling rhyme End words that have similar spelling but don't rhyme. move/love . tail rhyme In a stanza of long lines, the last line is shorter and is rhymed with one other line within the stanza which is also shorter. triple rhyme words that rhyme in 3 syllables eg mystery / history . tumbling rhyme Mono-rhymed lines until the rhyme runs out of energy then the lines switch to a new mono-rhymed series.
  9. Haiku Journal 2017 jvg #17 trapped inside hole of white monster machine loud buzzer pulses
  10. I'm going to have to learn the language to fully appreciate this one. I like the sound of it. I especially love the first stanza, it vibrates love. ~~Tink
  11. This prose poem is hauntingly beautiful Barry. I can see the painting of the 60 eyes in the sky vividly. I loved it. ~~Tink
  12. dded Barry, David, Marti, Geoff, Gatekeeper Forum Limericks A guy from Rhode Island is Tony it’s his work that rings true, never phony he steps up to the plate to write is his fate And his images sing life's testimony It's a Badger, the bard in clear color his work gives a smile or a cry, it’s a muller master of form all you ladies I warn he is charming, disarming, a luller Now there's Barry who writes from the UK it's a walk through his dreams with in one day an Eclipse of all others writes never of Mothers with a photo of Keats on display. Then Dave Parsley is known for his art He's a seer with a plan from the start he writes sonnets of love and long poems from above his devotion emits from his heart It is Benjamin paints with the word he is Geoff to the members who've heard It's his talent we cheer He is good never fear and no verses will ever be slurred Ah my man of the world is our Marti he employs form like a pro, he's a smarty Now from Texas he hails and his heart never fails to deliver a poem to inform or to party. There’s a doctor or con-man among us. his poems are thoughtful and righteous so is this a scam at least it’s not spam just enjoy and you’ll see, he’s ominous. Then there's Douglas a chap from Cape Town like a cutter of diamonds on countdown., his poems are sharp like the strings of a harp his words sing with the zing, he's renown. A Gatekeeper haikus with skill I would love to read more at will with words short and sweet is the way that we meet Catch the train to a place on the hill A gent from the south is our Rhyme Guy he is gracious and wise in his bow-tie he is willing to learn any technical term and observes from his heart with a kind-eye In Manila there is Joel writing verse, with words fluid and true, never terse. In a world set apart on an island of art he sends poems into space for the universe. Adding me to this list where I Tinker it is fun to create I'm a thinker it's my passion to learn for the art I will burn with my heart and my brain and my winker. And our English contingent Frank E with poetic, historic decree is quick to write tomes with Grimm’s little gnomes and a boon to this board, all agree. Frank is lost to us now. He will always be missed. In Japan there's an Irish Dedalus with his lilt he fluidly captures us historical rants and occasionally chants It's Brendan who's among the best of us It's Yarnspinner's trucker that got me a sad tale in a musical emotional spree he emotes from the soul it is tears he will dole In the snow we will go with a memory. From Buhtan there's a poet who's Golden it's the Tanka unique emboldens imagery at it's best her poems bequest an exotic display we're beholden. The Marshall in town we call Linda she patrols with her heart in the wind-a she’s quick on the draw to give a hurrah and her poetry ’s pure disciplined-a Now it’s Nick who will hate to be rhymed but it's better than he being slimed a master at lyric I’d say hemispheric and his comments are always well timed It’s Barooba you’ll find at the pub he performs while he’s eating his grub his language is strong even said to be wrong so we keep him in line with a club. There is Blog-jamb who’s mastered the sonnet writes of presidents, love and her bonnet his tomes he could sell like his sweet Villanelle with the praise that is lavished upon it. It is Lake that can calm us with Zen as serenity flows from her pen she will rest for a while ’neath the tree with the smile then she’ll write us a haiku again. Now it’s Jonathan’s tats that intrigue me do they match the great art of his poetry? When the seagulls fly west are they inked on his chest? Is he Carlo or Seagull, who is he? Now summayyah is young and alert a heart we don’t want to have hurt should her young man aspire her heart to acquire he must first wine and dine with dessert. Aleksandra was known to like cake it was sweets that would give her an ache so her boyfriend conspired a grill he acquired at their café she now orders steak. In our group is a lady named nia she writes poetry, sweet panacea the folks are beguiled but don’t get her riled to test her is one bad idea Anastasia’s a poet of merit we do find just beyond the pooled light unconfined her words come alive like a buzzing beehive from her verse, pollinating your mind At four in the morning you’ll find Larsen but don’t fret, he’s not planning an arson Victor simply can’t sleep and he just won’t count sheep he writes verse that’s approved by a parson. Victor has also passed from us. We miss you Victor. So, what do I do with til’ Sover? I wish that he hailed from Dover. he drove a blue truck in the rain and the muck and he fished from a meadow of clover. It is Wistful who lives in the barn she can spin a delightful turned yarn it’s her ship coming in if wrecked, its a sin then she’d swim to shore wet, no, oh darn! The Portuguese offer us J T Picasso can’t rival his creativity an artist so fair paints with words bare and the fire he sings us, proclivity. The Monster’s a young one with edge but to tame his panache he does pledge he’s on the right track and we all have his back a fence when he steps on the ledge. Manoel, a young friend from Brazil will make film and write ads for a meal he divides him from Him on a creative whim his talent and charm seals the deal. Now aureryr has me stumped from this series I almost bumped rolls out in barrels ignoring the perils but I hate to see anyone dumped. A man on a mission is Grasshopper now, I know he could tell us a whopper but he simply tells tales a flight he unveils I listen as if I an eavesdropper Our Canadian Miss Ivy, I think is a shy one yet she shares poems with us in the bright sun her images all brand new she prays twice, you can too the inkblots congeal and her poem is done. The Canuck we adore we call Fader he’s the opposite of the dread Darth Vader with his brother he fishes and he grants us 3 wishes his tomes are eclectic, a poetic crusader About Anna who lives in between twixt what and what does she mean? images seen through a lens scribed with her colorful pens she displays observations, she’s keen. There’s spauldhr the poet from France. with tomes choreographing a dance. to want is to haunt and maybe to flaunt the music of words is not by chance A Frenchman who goes by busard a funny dodo who landed here hard now sits on a bench sings of love in French and is welcome to play in our yard. (the funny dodo is busard’s expression not mine)
  13. Hi Barry, This reads almost like a sonnet. I loved the imagery and like Badge, I was struck by the personification. Nice work. ~~Tink
  14. match ignites in gloom soft glow surrounds single bloom wafts pungent perfume
  15. haiku journal 2017 jvg #16 ocean mist seeps into my skin taste of salt