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tonyv

Do You Enjoy Your Poems?

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tonyv

From time to time, I go back and read my poems. That's why like having my Member Archive topic where I can easily find links to my works which I've showcased on this site. I enjoy my poems. Still, there are those poems I won't read at each session; perhaps they're too intense and would lead me to re-visit times and events I would rather not re-live at the moment. What about you? Do you go back, re-read and enjoy your poems?


Here is a link to an index of my works on this site: tonyv's Member Archive topic

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badger11

I create the poem, but the poem exists outside of me. Like a child it grows when it interacts with readers. I don't own the poem. The poem has its own pulse. In addition, my purpose for writing is empathy and so the 'self' is not worried. As you know, I enjoy revisiting and reworking a write.

best

Phil

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tonyv
On 10/7/2019 at 1:18 AM, badger11 said:

I create the poem, but the poem exists outside of me. Like a child it grows when it interacts with readers. I don't own the poem. The poem has its own pulse.

Hmmm, yes ... I'll often let mine morph into something different from original intent, but that's only when I've decided that the poem is better because of it. Even so, I always remember my original intent even when it's not obvious to the reader. It's something that is still there for me like in steganography.

On 10/7/2019 at 1:18 AM, badger11 said:

In addition, my purpose for writing is empathy

I would like to understand more about this.


Here is a link to an index of my works on this site: tonyv's Member Archive topic

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badger11

The poem allows me to experience a richer life through empathy for others and situations I will not live. Similar to prose fictions I guess.

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tonyv
On 10/11/2019 at 9:56 AM, badger11 said:

The poem allows me to experience a richer life through empathy for others and situations I will not live. Similar to prose fictions I guess.

Yes, I'm working on understanding this. Perhaps I'm obtuse, because in my vernacular, "empathy" connotes compassion, sympathy, pity, of which often the individuals referenced in your poems don't seem to be in need. I think I'm looking deeper than is needed when it comes to your use of the word empathy ...


Here is a link to an index of my works on this site: tonyv's Member Archive topic

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badger11

I'm using the word in this sense: the ability to understand and share the feelings of another. The key characreristic is that the 'sharing' of the experience is from the inside not the outside. Therefore the self is diluted  😀

Quote

In another letter, Keats says that the 'poetical character... has no self- it is everything and nothing- it has no character and enjoys light and shade; it lives in gusto, be it foul or fair, high or low, rich or poor, mean or elevated- it has as much delight in conceiving an Iago as an Imogen. What shocks the virtuous philosopher delights the camelion Poet... A Poet is the most unpoetical of anything in existence, because he has no identity, he is continually filling some other body'

http://www.keatsian.co.uk/negative-capability.php

 

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