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Seamrog


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Lá Fhéile Pádraig Sona Daoibhan, old poem of mine, in honor of St Patrick's Day. It is written in an old French Verse Form, the Pantoum.

Seamrog

Today 's a day for wearing green,
St. Paddy, himself, would smile, agree.
The shamrock 's worn, a token seen
to teach about the Holy Three.

St. Paddy, himself, would smile, agree,
a slave with hope who grasped a star,
to teach about the Holy Three,
with faith his mission traveled far.

A slave with hope who grasped a star
and chased the serpents from the land,
with faith his mission traveled far,
in charity he took a stand.

He chased the serpents from the land
and now his message still is heard,
in charity he took a stand,
an act of love to share the Word,

And now his message still is heard,
the shamrock 's worn, a token seen
an act of love to share the Word.
Today 's, a day for wearing green.

----Judi Van Gorder
Lá Fhéile Pádraig Sona Daoibh


Seamrog, (Gaelic) shamrock, with its 3 leaves is said to represent not only the Holy Trinity, but also (the fruits of the spirit, faith, hope and charity), (love, valor and wit), (past, present and future) and uniquely Irish, (clever verse, music on the harp, and the art of shaving faces).

In the 5th century, 16 year old, Maewyn Succat, of Wales, was enslaved by marauders and brought to Ireland. During his 6 year captivity he fell in love the land of his captors. Upon his escape, he found his way through Britain to Gaul, where he entered a monastery and took the name Patricius. He trained for the priesthood and eventually was sent, at his request, as Bishop to Ireland. There he converted the Celtic natives, including important people, royalty etc, of this primarily pagan country. This angered the Celtic Druids and he was arrested several times but he always managed to escape. In his 30 year ministry, he created schools, monasteries and churches. Because of his efforts, the Irish became the most literate of Western Europe of the time. He is said to have used the shamrock in his sermons to explain the Trinity, three separate elements of one entity, the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. He died March 17, 461 AD and is buried in Derry Down, Ireland. Legend has him chasing the snakes from Ireland with a sermon from a mountain top. Some say this legend is a metaphor for the conversion of the masses from paganism to Christianity. Apparantly there are no snakes native to Ireland.

~~ © ~~ Poems by Judi Van Gorder ~~

For permission to use this work you can write to Tinker1111@icloud.com

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Inspiring. Clever. Witty. Fun !!

Have an ice cold green beer on me Tink !

better yet.....do you know what an 'irish car bomb' is ? Yummy !!

If you have you-tube on the computer.....

type in 'Clancy Brothers Mountian Dew' and listen......

also a coworker of mine named Patrick.....was named that because 24 years ago....he was born on the eve of Saint Paddy's day !

I bought my mom a 4 leaf clover necklace off ebay.......but some irish policeman dude said clovers dont come in 4's.......how dare he ! Mom says when she was a little kid, she'd always search the grass for the weeds......no weed killers then........all the time....and FIND 4 leaf clovers..........I read your poem and explanation to my mom just now........I'm visiting both my parents and staying the night......sister's kids 9th birthday......blah blah.....so she stood right next to me and listened....she loved it.......Donegal is where my mom's grandparents were from......

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goldenlangur

Hi Tink,

 

I haven't read a Pantoum for a long while and I like how you've used a religious-historical-mythical figure rather than the more popular romantic theme in your work. Thanks to Baudelaire this Malaysian folk poetic form has been brought to a wider audience.

 

The way your Pantoum increases in intensity of images and feelings in the closing stanza is quite effective. You bring to a head all the symbols of this fascinating person and link it with the continued observance of these symbols in contemporary times.

 

Tinker wrote:

 

And now his message still is heard,

the shamrock 's worn, a token seen

an act of love to share the Word.

Today 's, a day for wearing green.

-------------------
----Judi Van Gorder

.

 

 

Your notes on the Shamrock and St. Patric open the door to another world and give us something new to know and appreciate.

 

goldenlangur

goldenlangur

 

 

Even a single enemy is too many and a thousand friends too few - Bhutanese saying.

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Hi Jonathan, I am flattered you shared my poem with your family. I too used to look for 4 leaf clovers. No spray here, I will have to go out into the pasture and see if I can find one in honor of your Mom.

 

~~~Tink

~~ © ~~ Poems by Judi Van Gorder ~~

For permission to use this work you can write to Tinker1111@icloud.com

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Hi gl, Thank you for your comments. It was fun doing the research that resulted in this poem. I most liked that the efforts of St Patrick brought about schools and monastaries that resulted in Ireland being among most literate of European countries in that time. The tradition of excellence in Irish literatature has continued through poets such as Yeats and currently Seamus Heaney.

 

~Tink

~~ © ~~ Poems by Judi Van Gorder ~~

For permission to use this work you can write to Tinker1111@icloud.com

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Another form I have heard of but know nothing about. icon_redface.gif Of course, I do detect the rhyme scheme, repetition, and the iambic tet. icon_lol.gif Fortunately, I can visit the Verse Forms section to learn about the pantoum! icon_smile.gif

Tinker wrote:

In the 5th century, 16 year old, Maewyn Succat, of Wales, was enslaved by marauders and brought to Ireland. During his 6 year captivity he fell in love the land of his captors.

Incredible! Thanks for the background.

 

Tony

Here is a link to an index of my works on this site: tonyv's Member Archive topic

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Aleksandra

tonyv wrote:

 

Another form I have heard of but know nothing about.
icon_redface.gif
Of course, I do detect the rhyme scheme, repetition, and the iambic tet.
icon_lol.gif
Fortunately, I can visit the
Verse Forms
section to learn about the pantoum!
icon_smile.gif

 

Yea I agree with Tony icon_rolleyes.gif . I feel myself as laic when I read some forms. So yes Tony we must read and learn icon_eek.gif Anyway. I have said, I'm not good with forms and I better like the free verses. But ok , that is when I talk about myself to write. BUT icon_smile.gif I love to read. Tinker this was provoking - beautiful.

Much enjoyed. Ant this line it is very strong, and I loved:

a slave with hope who grasped a star,

 

ALeksandra

The poet is a liar who always speaks the truth - Jean Cocteau

History of Macedonia

 

 

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