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Poetry Magnum Opus

Riding the Tiger


goldenlangur

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goldenlangur

Into that lichen-coated cave

She rides astride a tiger,

Its eyes and nostrils aflame

Singeing the moss on the rocks –

A talisman to this day.

 

 

Mara slithers in a haze of perfumed seduction,

Swinging his hips, singing a deep-throated song

Of vaults of treasure, carnal knowledge and eternal pleasure.

 

He flings aside his robe of deepest red and sings:

 

"If you walk this path of love,

You’ll be the One for all times to come!"

 

Will her meditations on icy peaks

douse such flames of passion?

She utters not a word.

 

Images and thoughts

rise in fevered succession:

Mara sighs, Mara cries,

He dimples, he dances,

He laughs he lunges

at her.

 

 

She closes her eyes

from her depths swells

the cosmic syllable –

OM!

It fills the ancient cavern,

shakes the forest floor.

 

Mara raises his hands to his ears,

Writhing in anger and agony:

 

"This noise you make,

Churns me inside out.

But its spell will soon end,

Then I’ll return –

This battle is yet to be won!

 

She replies

 

"Together we will ride

My tiger of compassion,

Soar the heights of the Garuda,

Pierce the mirage of power,

Enter the rainbow of Bliss."

 

Mara spits, Mara swears

He swings his body to and fro,

He swivels his head

And screams –

A cry so raw,

It tears birds off their flight,

startles the snakes in their sleep.

 

The sage opens her Third Eye -

In a whorl of ululation

 

Mara dissolves.

 

 

 

goldenlangur

goldenlangur

 

 

Even a single enemy is too many and a thousand friends too few - Bhutanese saying.

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An absorbing tale, Golden. I like the trope here:

Mara slithers in a haze of perfumed seduction,

Swinging his hips, singing a deep-throated song

Of vaults of treasure, carnal knowledge and eternal pleasure,

and the musicality here:

Images and thoughts

rise in fevered succession:

Mara sighs, Mara cries,

He dimples, he dances,

He laughs he lunges

at her.

As always, I enjoy your use of local references, in this case Garuda. Intriguing title, too. The last line is uncanny, and it bridges the gap to the supernatural.

 

Tony

Here is a link to an index of my works on this site: tonyv's Member Archive topic

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GL, this piece is like a fragment from an epic.

"Words are not things, and yet they are not non-things either." - Ann Lauterbach

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goldenlangur

H Tony and JoelJosol,

 

Many thanks for reading this. The classic Buddhist account right from the historical Buddha to the various religious-historical figures, is one of a personal quest for enlightenment. Mara, represents temptation and distraction and is usually depicted as a female. Drawing on these strands I tried to imagine a scenario where a female sage is plagued by a male Mara to abandon her spiritual quest. Thereby hangs this tale!

 

Tony - I'm so pleased that you picked the sounds in this poem. Both the Tiger and the Garuda have mythical roles as vehicles of the these beings who achieve enlightenment. These creatures represent wisdom, knowledge, freedom from ignorance and worldly longings which it is believed cloud our minds.

 

 

I wrote this is in whoosh to get all the images out there and feel I have much to work on it.

 

JoelJosol - You're right about the epic character of such accounts.

 

 

With appreciation,

 

goldenlangur

goldenlangur

 

 

Even a single enemy is too many and a thousand friends too few - Bhutanese saying.

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Aleksandra

Wow this is wonderful poem.

You know how much I love your mythical poems and pieces of prose.

The connection between reality and old traditional rituals gives some special sense of your writing goldenlangur.

Because I know the meaning of Mara - the demon in the Buddhism, I compared the idea of this poem with the golgotha, temptations in the world.

With this: carnal knowledge and eternal pleasure- it is so clear what Mara try to do with all existence.

 

I loved the ending part and expression there it is powerful

The sage opens her Third Eye -

In a whorl of ululation

 

Mara dissolves.

 

With " In a whorl of ululation " it is given in this poem what exactly should mean Mara and that Mara dissolves on the end of the poem, I got that as yes there is some saving from all temptations. Just confused me why the sage opens her Third Eye, but maybe exactly that helped she to dissolves.

 

I am sorry goldenlagur if I am far away from the real sense of this poem. Just I read it like that. Anyway I loved this one.

 

Keep writing my friend, your work gives such a treasure.

 

Thank you so much for the sharing

 

Aleksandra

The poet is a liar who always speaks the truth - Jean Cocteau

History of Macedonia

 

 

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goldenlangur

Hi Aleksandra,

 

Thank you for your considered reading of this piece. You have been incredibly supportive of my writing and I'm very pleased that the theme of this poem appeals to you.

Yes, I do like the way you've linked Mara to "golgotha". I suppose ultimately in the Buddhist sense, Mara is one of the many illusions the mind goes through on its path to enlightenment. But yes, in iconography Mara is represented as a "demonic" presence, albeit it is one's own inner demons, one encounters in Mara.

 

The Third Eye in both Buddhism and Hinduism represents enlightenment or the culmination of higher consciousness. When the sage overcomes Mara or her own inner conflict, she attains enlightenment and Mara or illusions dissolve - this was my intention.

 

Thank you for making this point. It helps me to clarify these fundamental aspects of my religion and culture and I learn much in the process.

 

 

I appreciate the thought and consideration you've given this poem.

 

goldenlangur

goldenlangur

 

 

Even a single enemy is too many and a thousand friends too few - Bhutanese saying.

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Aleksandra

goldenlangur wrote:

The Third Eye in both Buddhism and Hinduism represents enlightenment or the culmination of higher consciousness.
When the sage overcomes Mara or her own inner conflict, she attains enlightenment and Mara or illusions dissolve - this was my intention
.

 

Definitely that goldenlangur. That is what I thought but I didn't knew how to express. And that have the right point of all of this poem and the meaning of the same. And because it is like it is, I think stays something good, I mean the poem gives some hope?

AH goldenlangur the poem is wonderful and I think you should give another part of this one icon_smile.gif

 

Much enjoyed

 

Aleksandra

The poet is a liar who always speaks the truth - Jean Cocteau

History of Macedonia

 

 

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goldenlangur

Hi again Aleksandra,

 

 

Thank you for returning with your thoughts on the Third Eye. I'm so glad that you understood its significance. Can I just say that I have no problem with your expressing yourself - you do it beautifully in a language which is not your mother tongue. it's more my struggle to explain images which are understood by people here but might not be so clear to others, outside:

 

 

 

"Definitely that goldenlangur That is what I thought but I didn't knew how to express. And that have the right point of all of this poem and the meaning of the same. And because it is like it is, I think stays something good, I mean the poem gives some hope? "

 

So I appreciate your trouble and enjoy our exchanges. Yes, definitely, a note of hope in this piece !

 

icon_smile.gif goldenlangur

goldenlangur

 

 

Even a single enemy is too many and a thousand friends too few - Bhutanese saying.

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