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This Full Moon


goldenlangur

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goldenlangur

28/12/07

 

This Full Moon

 

The bitter gourd vine

climbs to the sky

its tendrils unfurl and cling

to drifts of mists and clouds

like you now, a wraith

in dreams.

 

So I build chambers

with double bar doors

and yet you limber

in this in-between place

where night and day

are mere markings

on a clock face.

 

Across the icy Paro Chu

the old cantilever bridge rises and falls

to the dust of bunioned-feet pilgrims.

The clicking-clacking of their prayer beads,

the flapping-slapping of faded prayer flags

are the sole mantras I now offer,

and this full moon as many others

before her, is my witness.

 

 

 

 

 

Notes: Paro Chu is the name of a local river.

 

 

The first unedited version:

http//www.writersdock.org/modules.php?name=Forums&file=viewtopic&t=48036&highlight=

 

 

 

 

 

goldenlangur

goldenlangur

 

 

Even a single enemy is too many and a thousand friends too few - Bhutanese saying.

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Frank E Gibbard

Great sense of time and place in this Golden and lyrical pastoral and pleasant read my friend. One has grown to expect really. Frank

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goldenlangur

Thank you Frank.

 

I'm so glad that you find this a pleasant read and that you've enjoyed the images.

 

With appreciation icon_biggrin.png

 

goldenlangur

goldenlangur

 

 

Even a single enemy is too many and a thousand friends too few - Bhutanese saying.

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goldenlangur

Do you always have to take the piss pawnshop?

 

 

You have the option not to read my stuff if it so annoys you.

 

goldenlangur

goldenlangur

 

 

Even a single enemy is too many and a thousand friends too few - Bhutanese saying.

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Your poem, GL, creates both the sight and sound, of a religious ritual for, in my opinion, the dead. It's exotic in that way.

"Words are not things, and yet they are not non-things either." - Ann Lauterbach

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I wonder which bitter gourd grows on this vine? I would venture to guess that the poet is referring to the TINDOORI used in Indian cuisine. I love Indian and Thai food, so I am sure I must have consumed this ingredient at some point.

 

The first stanza sets an otherworldly tone:

The bitter gourd vine

climbs to the sky

its tendrils unfurl and cling

to drifts of mists and clouds

like you now, a wraith

in dreams.

The IMAGE which inspired my poem "Florida," and which I also used in the Haiga Challenge (in the Playground), immediately comes to mind.

 

In the second stanza, you liken night and day to mere markings/on a clock face. This comparison gives the events described in the poem a sense of timelessness.

 

The icy river offers another perspective. I think of Bhutan as a tropical area, but it seems that cold weather can be found even there. Perhaps there are mountains ... or perhaps I err in associating this work with events in your country. Please pardon the inference I have drawn if that is in fact the case. Lovely sonics in the last stanza.

 

Tony

Here is a link to an index of my works on this site: tonyv's Member Archive topic

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goldenlangur

Hello JoelJosol,

 

You're so right - this piece was inspired by the annual memorial rites, last winter, for someone dear who died suddenly.

 

I'm very grateful that the sounds and images came through for you.

 

 

With appreciation.

 

 

goldenlangur

goldenlangur

 

 

Even a single enemy is too many and a thousand friends too few - Bhutanese saying.

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goldenlangur

Hi Tony,

 

You're indeed right - bitter gourd is quite popular in Indian home cooking but I don't know if it is served in restaurants as it is an acquired taste.

 

How kind of you to say that the lines you've highlighted remind you of your poem! A meeting of images and spirits in ether - one of the great and wonderful aspects of such internet forums!

 

Re: your point about tropical - we certainly have the Himalayan foothills, which we share with Bengal and Assam, states of India. Here are the famous malarial "jungles", that the British feared so much as they tried to push their way through to Tibet. We also have the Himalayas to the north in a wide arc, linking/separating us from Tibet and the valleys here are definitely cold.

 

The river i refer to is in a valley which is a popular pilgrim centre with rock temples, monasteries and stupas dedicated to one of the most popular teachers, Guru Rimpoche or the Second Buddha as he is also known as. But with global warming and our glacier lakes melting, we might well become a tropical island if the Himalayas submerge into the Indian ocean!

 

 

 

As ever thank you very much for taking the trouble to read and post your thoughts.

 

goldenlangur

goldenlangur

 

 

Even a single enemy is too many and a thousand friends too few - Bhutanese saying.

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Aleksandra

So I build chambers

with double bar doors

and yet you limber

in this in-between place

where night and day

are mere markings

on a clock face.

Ah how much I enjoyed in this part goldenlangur.

I google that river Paro Chu and what I can say - wonderful imagery and you found the best place into your poem.

 

I love this poem GL . It is so picturesque and rich with imageries and soul. The poem is so refreshing and gives another view of nature and beauty

 

Thank you a lot for sharing this wonderful poetical piece

 

Aleksandra

The poet is a liar who always speaks the truth - Jean Cocteau

History of Macedonia

 

 

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