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  1. (Based on the vivid imagery in Alan Watts' book Myth and Ritual in Christianity. Another in the ancient Welsh form englyn penfyr, and a companion, of sorts, to First Light. The Tenebrae Candle is the VERY last candle to remain lit during the ancient Midnight Matins service.) Eve before an easter morn - on this night, Minds contrite; by sadness torn, We kneel and pray, hearts careworn. Eve before an easter morn - one last light, Candle bright, may seem to mourn Like an empty life outworn. Eve before an easter morn - but this light, Ever right and never lorn, Is a sign of God r
  2. Night before a Christmas morn – stars tarry; Hymns carry a world so torn To be saved by God's Yet-born. Night before a Christmas morn – all is seen Red and green. Our hearts, forsworn, Still are gifts to God's Low-born. Night before a Christmas morn – in the dark, Holy spark. Candles have borne Ev'ry soul to God's High-born. (The memory of my first Christmas at Universalist National Memorial Church, at the impressive “Recessional of the Candles” during “Silent Night”. This is a version of the ancient Welsh form englyn penfyr. Please note that I am NOT a religious fundamentali
  3. Explore the Craft of Writing Poetry Welsh Verse Features of the Welsh Meters Welsh Codified Divisions Englyn penfyr, én-glin pén-fir or short ended englyn in the old style, is the 1st codified Official Welsh Meter, an Englyn. The oldest Welsh poetry in manuscript (early 9th century) was found written in the margin of the Juvencus Metrical Version of the Psalms, preserved in the Cambridge University Library. It is said to be stanzas written in praise of the Trinity in the englyn penfyr meter. Both the Englyn penfyr and the Englyn milwr are associated with "primitive Britain" and were out
  4. Explore the Craft of Writing Poetry Welsh Verse Features of the Welsh Meters Welsh Codified Divisions Englyn milwr, én-glin míl-wer (the soldier's englyn), the 2nd codified Official Welsh Meter, an Englyn, was often written in proverb, englynion y clyweit (the stanza of hearing). The verse is efficiently short, some might say terse. Originally a susinct poem in praise of a leaders valor and sometimes satire of a leader's failings, a Welsh epigram. It was actually thrown out of the "official meters" at one time, but its popularity and continued use earned its right to be included in the co
  5. Explore the Craft of Writing Poetry Welsh Verse Features of the Welsh Meters Welsh Codified Divisions Englyn unodl union, én-glin éen-oddle éen-yon (straight one rhyme englyn)the 3rd codified Official Welsh Meter, is the most popular of the Englyn meters and is often referred to as simply Englyn. It can range from lyrical to didactic and sometimes satirical. It is said to require "pithy expression and concise thinking." Singing in Chains by M. Hopwood. The uneven lines are referred to as the paladr or shaft and the even lines are the esgyll or wings of the stanza. Important features of th
  6. Explore the Craft of Writing Poetry Welsh Verse Features of the Welsh Meters Welsh Codified Divisions Englyn unodl crwca, én-glin éen-oddle crewc (crooked short one rhyme englyn) the 4th codified Official Welsh Meter, an Englyn,, is the structural reverse of Englyn unodl union which is far more popular. The englyn unodl crwca is rarely used. The elements of the Englyn unodl crwc are: stanzaic, written as any number of quatrains, syllabic, 7-7-10-6 syllable per line. rhymed, mono rhymed. In L3 the main rhyme is found in the last half of the line followed by caesura
  7. Explore the Craft of Writing Poetry Welsh Verse Features of the Welsh Meters Welsh Codified Divisions Englyn cyrch, én-glin circh (two rhyme englyn), the 5th codified Official Welsh Meter, an Englyn is verse that employs cyrch which means internal rhyme. The elements of the Englyn cyrch are: stanzaic, written in any number of quatrains made up of 2 Cywydd couplets, the Cywydd deuair hirion and Awdl gywydd. syllablic, 7 syllable lines. rhymed, AaBA with the end syllable of L3 rhymed somewhere in the first half of L4. x x x x x x A (stressed last syllable)
  8. Explore the Craft of Writing Poetry Welsh Verse Features of the Welsh Meters Welsh Codified Divisions Englyn proest dalgron, én-glin proyst dál-gron ( half rhymed englyn), sometimes referred to as Englyn Proest Cyfnewidlog is verse that utilizes proest or half rhyme but no full rhyme. It is the 6th codified Official Welsh Meter, an Englyn, The elements of the englyn proest dalgron are: stanzaic, written in any number of quatrains. syllabic, made up of 7 syllable lines. rhymed, all of the lines half rhyme. In this stanza form, the rhymes are formed by vowels of the
  9. Explore the Craft of Writing Poetry Welsh Verse Features of the Welsh Meters Welsh Codified Divisions Englyn lleddfbroest, én-glin lléd-uhv-broyst (diphthong half rhymed englyn), the 7th codified Official Welsh Meter, an Englyn, is close to impossible to emulate in English. Therefore, if you want to give this one a try, consider yourself successful if you get sort of close to these sounds. As the on-line site Kalliope says "in English, cheat". The elements of the englyn lleddfbroest are: stanzaic, written in any number of quatrains. syllabic, 7 syllable lines. rhyme
  10. Explore the Craft of Writing Poetry Welsh Verse Features of the Welsh Meters Welsh Codified Divisions Englyn proest gadwynog én-glin proyst ga-doy-nóg cadwyn or (chain of half-rhyme), the 8th codified Official Welsh Meter, an Englyn, is verse that employs both alternating full rhyme which half rhymes with the alternating full rhymes. To complicate things further no half rhyme may occur within the lines. The elements of the englyn proest gadwynog are: stanzaic, written in a chain of quatrains. syllabic, 7 syllable lines. rhymed, each line half rhymes with the next
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