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Found 2 results

  1. Tinker

    Wyatt/Surrey Sonnet

    Explore the Craft of Writing Poetry The Sonnet Sonnet Comparison Chart English Verse Although the sonnet began in Italy in the 13th century, Thomas Wyatt 1503-1542, was one of the first English poets to translate and utilize the form. He used the Petrarchan octave but introduced a rhyming couplet at the end of the sestet. His friend the Earl of Surrey also initiated more rhyme. The Italian form was restricted to 5 rhymes. After Wyatt and Surrey the sonnet could have 7 rhymes. They also shifted the sonnet away from the slightly more intellectual and argumentative Petrarchan form, and
  2. Explore the Craft of Writing Poetry English Verse Common Measure In the 15th to 16th centuries, English clerics were seeking a catchy rhythm and sound in which to set and sing the Psalms to capture the hearts and minds of the laity. They chose the popular Ballad Meter familiar to most everyone. They adapted the ballad rhythm and form to more formal and scriptural topics, eliminating the narrative, colloquial language. They called it Common Measure and developed several variations. The first poems were meant to be lyrics set to music. The metered lines give a musical sound to the poem. Emi
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