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Found 12 results

  1. David W. Parsley

    Such Country As the Lovers Own

    SUCH COUNTRY AS THE LOVERS OWN Such country as the lovers choose is no tract for any but the saintly: there, a wired fence goes down at the end of a graveled road – each path thereafter, deer track, bear trail, boundaries set by the stone and weed as the reader discerns, butte-sites where the lovers come down in silence, smallness of world held pendulum-like between them. Such talk as stills there is not lost, but given place: a gap they could close with lips that kiss. Or pray. In such country as the lovers own, skies hover in the way of storms, clouds the soli
  2. Explore the Craft of Writing Poetry The Ode Greek Verse Aeolic Verse, refers to poetry made up from any of a group of metric patterns commonly used in the lyrical works of Sappho and Alcaeus. Aeolis was the west and northwestern region of Asia Minor which included most of the Greek city-states and the Island of Lesbos in the 8th to 6th centuries BC, the Greek Dark Ages. Four classic meters are known from that culture, the Alcaic Stanza, the Sapphic Stanza, Glyconics (the basic form of Aeolics) and Hendecasyllabic Verse,. The verse is quantitative, usually hendecasyllabic, employing 11 syl
  3. Tinker

    The Horatian Ode

    Explore the Craft of Writing Poetry Greek Verse Latin Verse The Ode The Horatian Ode is the Latin descendant of the Aeolic ode, both of which were written to project a tranquil, contemplative tone meant for meditation. Both retain the purpose and formality of all odes, however, the Latin descendant attributed to Horace in 20 BC, is better preserved. The Horatian Ode is simply a stanzaic form in which all stanzas are structured in the same pattern at the discretion of the poet. (rhyme, meter, number of lines etc.), more technically it is "nonce stanzaic" or a "homostrophic" ode (ode made
  4. Explore the Craft of Writing Poetry The Ode Greek Verse The Anacreontic Ode is proof that an ode need not be long and lofty. The Greek poet Anacreon often wrote odes in praise of pleasure and drink, a Dithyramb or Skolion. Often the odes were made up of 7 syllable, rhymed couplets known as Anacreontic couplets. Some of Anacreon's poems were paraphrased by English poet Abraham Cowley in 1656 in which he attempted to emulate Greek meter. The main concern of several 17th-century poets was that the poem should avoid "piety" by "Christian" poets who would tame the spirit and make the form worthles
  5. Tinker

    Thematic Odes

    Explore the Craft of Writing Poetry The Ode Often Odes are named for the theme or subject of the poem. Here are a few: Elegy, Obsequy, Threnody Ode Elemental Ode is a poem that glorifies everyday things. Chilean poet Pablo Neruda is associated with this genre and is a master at venerating the most common things, the sock, salt, and/or tomato. The frame is at the discretion of the poet. Ode to the Onion by Pablo Neruda Ode to My Left Hand by Judi Van Gorder Oh, neglected left hand, I know I have not favored you in the past, the right seems
  6. Explore the Craft of Writing Poetry| The Ode Greek Verse The Choral Ode, Pindaric Ode or Dorian Ode distinguishes itself from other odes because of its three-part order. It is also strophic, not stanzaic like the Horatian, Keatsian and Ronsardian Odes. The strophe may differ in structure within the poem, while the stanza is uniform in structure within the poem. This verse form introduced by Pindar 522-433 BC Greece was originally written to be performed by chorus and dance and was therefore "emotional, intense, brilliant and changeable to entertain an audience" (Quote found in my research
  7. Tinker

    Occasional poetry

    Explore the Craft of Writing Light Verse Occasional poetry is verse written for an occasion such as a birthday, graduation, birth or any event really. It is normally considered Light Verse but it could loosely come under the genre of an ode. We usually associate an ode with lofty purpose and expect it to be long. Occasional poetry need not be so lofty nor need it be long, but the fact is, neither does the ode. (I am sure I am going against all of the poetry pundits, but this makes sense to me.) The purpose is near the same in that both are written in honor of a particular event or person.
  8. Tinker

    Wedding Odes

    Explore the Craft of Writing Poetry Greek Verse The Ode Wedding Odes Epithalamion or Epithalamium (from Greek "at the bridal chamber") is an ode celebrating marriage. Sappho (7th-6th century B.C.) may have been the first to use the genre but it was revived during the Renaissance and Sir Edmund Spencer, John Donne, and Dryden are a few of the poets to write verse within the genre. This ode was originally written in 3 strophes. One to be sung at the bedroom door, lusty in nature, urging the newlyweds to enjoy their wedding night and designed to muffle the sounds that came from the roo
  9. Tinker

    The Ode and its Variations

    Explore the Craft of Writing Poetry The Ode (from Greek - aeidein "to sing or chant") is a genre of poetry in which the subject is praised, exalted or favorably contemplated. The term "ode" is concerned more with its exalted theme than the structure of the poem, although there are variations that do incorporate a specific structure or frame in their delivery. The ode displays three qualities, focus on one subject or object, an extended and elaborated description of the subject and last, a celebratory or praising tone. Edmund Gosse defined the ode as "enthusiastic and exalted lyrical
  10. Tinker

    Ronsardian Ode

    Explore the Craft of Writing Poetry The Ode French Verse The Ronsardian Ode is the creation of a deaf, French poet Pierre de Ronsard (1524-1585). He was known as the Prince of Poets, a "romance" poet. Ronsard's work is musical, sensuous and pagan. Interesting that he was a cleric in minor orders and yet his poems focused more on the beauties and sorrows of his loves than spiritual matters. The structure of this stanzaic form is specific, like the Keatsian Ode it follows a uniform stanzaic pattern. It is its unique pattern that sets it apart. The elements of the Ronsardian Ode are:
  11. Tinker

    The Keatsian or English Ode

    Explore the Craft of Writing Poetry The Ode English Verse The Keatsian or English Ode is a stanzaic form which appears to be the result of John Keats' experimentation with the sonnet. It reflects a merging of the Sicilian quatrain and Italian sestet from the same-named sonnets. In theme, purpose, and sincerity it follows that of all Odes. The Keatsian Ode differs from the Horatian Ode in that its structure of line and stanza is a set pattern of meter, rhyme, and length, while the Horatian Ode's is "nonce" stanzaic, the structure patterned is at the discretion of the poet. The e
  12. Tinker

    Irregular or Cowleyan Ode

    Explore the Craft of Writing Poetry The Ode English Verse Irregular Ode or Cowleyan Ode, as the first name implies is an ode made up of a number of strophes that are unlike in structure. This verse is also sometimes called the Cowleyan Ode for 17th century English poet Abraham Cowley who studied the odes of Pindar and attempted to emulate them. But unlike Pindar, Cowley's odes did not relegate the various strophes to the triad order of the Pindaric Ode. Neither did it retain the uniform stanzas of the Horatian, Keatsian or Ronsardian Odes. The various strophes of the Irregular or Co
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