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Found 9 results

  1. Tinker

    Terza Rima or Diaspora Sonnet

    Explore the Craft of Writing Poetry The Sonnet Sonnet Comparison Chart English Verse The Terza Rima or Diaspora Sonnet, appeared in England in the 19th century. It makes use of the interweaving pattern and forward movement of the Italian Terza Rima. This variation of the sonnet is written in tercets with an interlocking rhyme scheme and concludes with a refrain or invocation in the form of a heroic couplet. The Greek word "diaspora" means "scattered abroad". The Bible used the word to refer to the Jews who lived outside of Palestine after the Babylonians destroyed Jerusalem in 587 B.C.
  2. The Sonnet is probably one of the most popular verse forms written. Several noted poets have tried their hand and offered a slightly skewed rhyme scheme or stanza arrangement to some of their sonnets resulting in someone emulating and naming the sonnet frame after the poet. Are they legitimate separate sonnet forms or are they simply variations of the Petrarchan or Shakespearean forms, who is to say? Here are a few that you may run across. The American Sonnet or Percival's Sonnet named for James Gates Percival's contributed sonnets with a loose metric rhythm consistent with American speec
  3. Tinker

    When in the Woods

    When in the Woods by Judi Van Gorder Settling into stillness, spine straight, shoulders relaxed, lines from a Robert Frost poem glide through my thoughts. Recall images lost. Settling into stillness I open to the sounds of a squirrel up high gathering for winter and never asking why. Settling into stillness the minutes drop away. Pain and joy become one moment, no time to waste before my work is done. Just chasing a form. This is a Monchielle
  4. Tinker

    Lectio divina

    Explore the Craft of Writing Poetry Liturgical Verse Lectio divina is a spiritual practice but for the purposes of this forum it could be classified as a poetic genre. As such it is a poet's response in verse to something he/she has read aloud and meditated upon. This genre invites the poet to frame the response in whatever manner they wish. The spiritual practice of lectio divina - Latin for "holy or sacred reading" is an extension of haga - a prayerful Jewish meditation of chanted scripture. In ancient times when scripture was not readily available to all, holy men would gather to
  5. Tinker

    III. Three Line Construction

    Explore the Craft of Writing Poetry The Frame Three Line Construction Three line units of poetry could fall under one or all of the general terms tristich, tercet and triplet. The differences are purely technical rhetoric since all three terms are used synonymously. However, there can be divisions which I attempt to delineate here. A tristich is a complete poem in three lines. Both the tercet and triplet can also be a tristich. I found the words tercet and triplet to be commonly interchanged, although there were attempts at separating the two terms by various sources. Respected sou
  6. Tinker

    Eclogue

    Explore the Craft of Writing Greek Verse An Eclogue (Greek for "selected pieces") is a short narrative written in the manner of a monologue. The poet explains how he/she feels about a subject, why he/she feels that way and why the reader should also feel the same way. The verse was originally centered on country living, in a idyllic pastoral setting. It is smooth and fluid patterned after the poems of the Greek poet, Theocritus (300 B.C.). Inspired by Theocritus the Roman poet, Virgil took the eclogue a step further and brought imagery and drama to the verse. His works brought a sens
  7. Tinker

    Classical Hendecameter

    Explore the Craft of Writing Greek Poetry The Classical Hendecameter is one of the 4 classic meters of Aeolic verse from the 8th-6th centuries BC Greek Dark Ages. It was used generously many centuries later by the Engish poet Alfred Lord Tennyson. It is an 11 syllable line written with a trochee followed by a dactyl and 3 trochees in that order. The first and last trochees can be spondees. In Greek, quantitative verse Ls-Lss-Ls-Ls-Ls L= long sound or syllable s= short sound or syllable or LL-Lss-Ls-Ls-LL In English accentual syllabic verse applies Su-Suu-Su-Su-Su
  8. Explore the Craft of Writing Poetry The Frame II The Couplet An octosyllabic couplet or short couplet is two iambic or trochaic tetrameter lines, often rhymed. Octosyllabic could also refer to any couplet of 8 syllable lines. The woods are lovely, dark and deep. But I have promises to keep, And miles to go before I sleep, And miles to go before I sleep. --- Robert Frost, Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening
  9. Tinker

    Robert Frost, Sower

    Robert Frost, Sower Some forty years ago, I saw him stand up next to J.F.K. and heard them call him Poet Laureate. He read aloud from shaking paper held in wrinkled hands. I don't remember any words he spoke, it was his gravel voice that stayed with me. I had an inkling then I witnessed steel and still I hear him now, the harness bells and swinging birches, sounds connecting voice and pen. He planted a seed in me that day, a need to share this vibrant world in verse. --- Judi Van Gorder
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