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Nordic Verse

Runic Verse  (roon: Old English meaning mystery) is a genre of verse that originally referred to 3 poems, Old Norse, Icelandic and Anglo Saxon. It is predicated on the power and magic of words. 

Symbols of the Tuetonic alphabet are associated with Runes which are carved on swords, chalices and stones. Verse was used by the ancient cultures as memory aids, this is especially true of Runic Verse. One ancient verse is merely a list of the rune symbols and their meaning. The earliest recorded Runic Verse is the 8th century Old Norse poem in skaldic meter. The 9th century Anglo Saxon and 13th century Icelandic poems are metrically different though they all have several parallels and include allusions to Norse and Anglo paganism. The Tuetonic alphabet is intricately enveloped within the verse.

Today Runic verse is a genre that uses any chant like sonic pattern to conjure images of mystery and magic.

Os - Language of the Runes by Judi Van Gorder


os language.gif   Hidden inside its great expanse
            Language
                  can claim hearts
                        destroy enemies
                               and fuck up destinies.
            A phrase, the perfect phrase, the well timed phrase
                  is the mystic quest, the Golden Fleece.

The Runes of Weyland's Sword by Rudyard Kipling

A Smith makes me
To betray my Man
In my first fight.

To gather Gold
At the world's end
I am sent.

The Gold I gather
Comes into England
Out of deep Water.

Like a shining Fish
Then it descends
Into deep Water.

It is not given
For goods or gear,
But for The Thing.

The Gold I gather
A King covets
For an ill use,

The Gold I gather
Is drawn up
Out of deep Water.

Like a shining Fish
Then it descends
Into deep Water.

It is not given
For goods or gear,
But for The Thing.
Runic Verses by George Burrows 1913

O the force of Runic verses,
O the mighty strength of song
Cannot baffle all the curses
Which to mortal state belong.

Slaughter'd chiefs, that buried under
Heaps of marble, long have lain,
Song can rend your tomb asunder,

Give ye life and strength again.
When around his dying capture,
Fierce, the serpent draws his fold,
Song can make him, wild with rapture,

Straight uncoil, and bite the mould.
Then from keep and battled tower,
Flames to heaven upward strain,
Song has o'er them greater power,
Than the vapours dropping rain.

It can quench the conflagration
Striding o'er the works of art;
But nor song nor incantation
Can appease love's cruel smart.

O the force of Runic verses,
O the mighty strength of song
Cannot baffle all the curses
Which to mortal state belong.

The Runes
Feoh Feoh: wealth Ur Ur: wild ox  Thorn Thorn: thorns os language.gifOs: language  Rad Rad: riding cen.gif   Cen: the torch

 

Gyfu Gyfu: the gift    Wyn Wyn: joy           Haegel Haegl: hail     Nyd Nyd: need      Is Is: ice         Ger   Ger: the year

 

Eoh Eoh: the yew    Peordh Peorth: the hall  EolhsEolhx: a water      Sigel   Sigel: the sun Tir Tir: a star  Beorc Beorc: the birch
                                                                           plant that bites   

Eh Eh: the horse   Mann Man: human beingLagu Lagu: the sea  Ing Ing: god of fertilityEthel Ethel: native land

 

Daeg Daeg: the dayAc Ac: the oak  Aesc Aesc: the ash  Yr Yr: the bow  Ior Iar: sea creature Ear Ear: clay/death

Graphics from Runic Poems

 

~~ © ~~ Poems by Judi Van Gorder ~~

For permission to use this work you can write to Tinker1111@icloud.com

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