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Tinker

Ooogling the Bing

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Just some silliness....

Oogling the Bing

With Yahoo, Google and Bing,
you can find just about any thing.
Some of it fiction, some of it fact,
naughty events caught in the act.

Who wants to purchase, who will sell?
Plastic buys things I won't tell.
Poets and grandkids are on my list,
mindful that predators lurk in the mist.

Explore to gain knowledge, friendship and fun,
amazing the ease with which it's done.
The world wide web has captured the ring
with Yahoo, Google and Bing.
---------------- --- Judi Van Gorder

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Hi Tinker,

 

It is a lighthearted and fun read. It captured the convenience www is able to offer but at the same time the hidden danger on-line. Your rhyme makes this poem even entertaining.

 

Thanks for the fun read.

 

Lake

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This is absolutely delightful a view of what modern technology has given us to make our lives even more complicated than we thought was possible. Yes, I too now waste time on looking for info I could most likely get by without and buy things sight-unseen that wind up as nothing more than decorations collecting dust on my already overflowing shelves.

 

Thank you, sweey Judi.

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Hi Lake, Thank you, I am glad you were entertained. I wrote it in response to a Picture Challenge on another forum. Just something fun to do.

 

waxwings, I am pleased you liked it. Yes the internet can be addicting and it is so easy to buy all kinds of strange things off the internet with that plastic card. ;)

 

~~Tink

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I did not fully realize how masterful and fun this poem is until I thought it sounded limericky and began scanning it. I will edit this further because this site will not recognize the markup I used to make sure where the stresses and the boundaries of the feet are.limits

 

Here is one way to scan your poem. There are other ways, but this is the strongest/more representative of those possible. It follows the precept (exceptions are permissible) that classic metric feet should not span from mid word to mid word, i.e. segregating syllables of one word one from another.

 

The Greeks were quite thorough in designing metric feet of up to four syllables, in order to expose rhythm without interfering with the normal flow of language, and accommodating, as needed, pauses between feet. I still have to puzzle out the full meaning of cola's, but the Greeks recognized that they could encompass up to 12 syllables, i.e., word groups that are syntagmatic. This may answer why caesuras supposedly do not upset meter, which they tend to do if a foot tries to span one or accommosate the collision of too many stressed or unstressed syllables in a row.

 

 

With Yahoo, Google and Bing, ... ... ... ... ... ... ... amphibrach, trochee, iamb,

one can find just about any thing. ... ... ... ... ... ... 2 anapests, dactyl

Some of it fiction, || some of it fact,... ... ... ... dactyl, trochee, 2 choriambs

naughty events || caught in the act. .. ... ... ... ... ... 2 choriambs

 

Who wants to purchase, who will sell? ... ... ... iamb, amphibrach, cretic (or amphimacer)

Plastic buys things || I won't tell.... ... ... ... ... ... ... choriamb, cretic

Poets || are on my list, ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... trochee, cretic, diamb

mindful that predators lurk in the mist. ... ... ... trochee, 2nd paeon, choriamb

 

Explore to gain knowledge, || friendships and fun, ... iamb, 3rd paeon, choriamb

amazing the ease with which it's done. ... ... amphibrach, 3 iambs

The world wide web || has captured the ring ... ... ... ... diamb, amphibrach, iamb

With Yahoo, Google and Bing. ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... anapest, trochee, iamb

 

How's them cookies!?

 

waxwings

Edited by waxwings

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Cleverly up-to-date, Tinker. I'm impressed how you can still temper the addiction with some concern for on line safety. I myself am pretty bad. I ride around with a computer, on line, in my car. And for those times that I absolutely can't be at the console, I stay connected via my BlackBerry. Pretty pathetic, I know :icon_redface: ...

 

Tony :)

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Thanks Douglas, i hope it brought a smile to your face.

 

Wow waxwings you did more work in scansion than I did in writing. I will have to look up cretic and paeon. Unfortunately what you show in the scan is that my rhythm is erratic. Hmmmm

 

LOL Tony, That is why you respond right away every time I have a crisis. I am always blown away by your quick replies when I have a problem. Thank you for that by the way. And thank you for calling my poem "up to date". I am not often accused of that. :rolleyes:

 

~~Tink

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Wow waxwings you did more work in scansion than I did in writing. I will have to look up cretic and paeon. Unfortunately what you show in the scan is that my rhythm is erratic. Hmmmm

 

~~Tink

 

Nothing erratic about you. Meter is so not rhythm, beacause rhythm is way beyond and above meter. Scansion is merely a way to begin to reveal just how the pleasing effect of sounds in speech is augmented by stress patterns. Obviously, your talent to make pleasing speach rhythm is better than your detailed insight of classic meters or normal speech stress patterns. I am jealous be cause for me the opposite may be true.

Edited by waxwings

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Ah, this becomes of academia after waxwings' scansion. Some of the terminologies are new to me, which I've never come across before. Correct me if I'm wrong, according to waxwings's analysis, it seems the meters are scanned based on the phrases, and basically the poem is consisted of 2 or 3 meters per line.

 

This analysis brings up a question I've had in my mind for a long time -when I read a free verse, I usually follow the rhythm and cadence. So when I hear people mention the meter is off in a free verse, I'm totally confused. Any help here?

 

Cheers,

 

Lake

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Lake, think of meter as an underlying beat, a poem's regular beat, like the beat in a piece of music. Think of the variations (the substituted feet, choice of syntax, rhyme, etc.) as the music superimposed over that beat. The meter, the beat, is there; even with substituted feet, the underlying beat is there in the backdrop.

 

The beat -- the regular rhythm -- must be there in metrical poems. While all poems have musicality (or should) metrical poems, unlike free verse, have regular rhythm. Free verse has rhythm, but not regular rhythm. The lines may be different lengths and line breaks, stanza breaks, natural cadences of the English language (which is primarily iambic, even if one reads prose), and other poetic devices make up the poem's musicality. Free verse does not have meter, a regular rhythm from line to line, and we don't scan it to analyze it's rhythm. I'll make a topic in literary discussion about it.

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Thank you Tony for your quick reply. I'll readi it a few times. It's very helpful.

 

Think of the variations (the substituted feet, choice of sytax, rhyme, etc.) as the music superimposed over that beat.

 

Well said. Do you play any instrument?

 

Looking forward to the discussion.

 

Lake

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Lake, think of meter as an underlying beat, a poem's regular beat, like the beat in a piece of music. Think of the variations (the substituted feet, choice of syntax, rhyme, etc.) as the music superimposed over that beat. The meter, the beat, is there; even with substituted feet, the underlying beat is there in the backdrop.

 

The beat -- the regular rhythm -- must be there in metrical poems. While all poems have musicality (or should) metrical poems, unlike free verse, have regular rhythm. Free verse has rhythm, but not regular rhythm. The lines may be different lengths and line breaks, stanza breaks, natural cadences of the English language (which is primarily iambic, even if one reads prose), and other poetic devices make up the poem's musicality. Free verse does not have meter, a regular rhythm from line to line, and we don't scan it to analyze it's rhythm. I'll make a topic in literary discussion about it.

 

Interesting view of how a poem may acquire musicality. However, it is not fair to say that the underlying beat, if there is such, in poems is like that in music. I have read arguments about whether the concept of beat in music is unambiguous, because it can mean either the overal thing you can dance/sway to, or just the designated number of pulses/notes per measure/bar, a more regular and predetermined quantity.

 

Seems English is bewitched by a iambic trend. That may be, at least in part, due to that English, when compared with the dozen or so other languages I am conversant with, is richer in mono- and di-syllabic words. A poet may be blessed with the ability to arrange these words to create meters other than iambic and still retain an underlyingthe sense of iambic, while careful scansion shows it is far from that.

 

waxwings

Edited by waxwings

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Tink --

 

You are a dangerous woman, outing these people just before the Christmas shopping season when they're begging us to do our plastic best!! Oops, that reminds me ... need to get in a few presents!

 

Bren

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and i thouht i gave people headaches waxwings. geesh lmnaao. laughing my nuts and ass off. i know like a hundred words or more in around a dozen languages. people don't understand me lol. when i speak i incorporate every language i know into one sentence. hows them apples cretic and gailic. my sister shannon's past life lol. don't ask im not in this world most of the time. im high on 39 different medications ifi had any children. how would they come out. probably look like a red devil. actually i was told by chinese ninjas to smoke opium. i was trained in herbs by ninjas so rreally im healthy lol. any scancion howd you find this stuff. your to brillant ikars.

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tinker my mom dad and i watch my nephews like a hawk. only seven and eight they use the bloody freakin internet. to dangerous to play outside anymore with the failing ozone layer. the internet is dangerous. i know what is out there. i read the garbage and can't tell what is fact and what is fiction. brings up the point do you see actual documents of every type of poetry out there lol. religion and political views come to mind i saw a judge of religions had 200,000 religions listed most of them i never heard of before lol. and i have been study religions for 34 years. my friend asked me to translate late latin vulgate i don't want anyone to know that i read latin. the doctors i have don't know im a botaist lol. mixing of herbs roots and flowers. hmmm. well my friend ilearned about greenhouses asa child.

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