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dcmarti1

(Where is Bulgaria's equivalent of Vaclav Havel?)

Work clothes drying on a line
One street over from the oldest
Tree in Plovdiv, one street over
In Europe's oldest city;

Crusty bread wafting through the air,
Mixed with coughs from ancient
Citroens and Skodas, one street over
In Europe's oldest city;

A bistro's french press coffee pot
Stands forgotten, its liquor as tepid
As the deep Summer night, one street over
In Europe's oldest city:

One street over in Europe's oldest city,
Archdeacons and Ex-Communists,
Plotting to usurp the power of the poor,
Will be outlived by the oldest tree in Plovdiv.

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badger11
Quote

Archdeacons and Ex-Communists,
Plotting to usurp the power of the poor

The poem translates a lack of progress in those coughs from ancient Citroens and Skodas - like the coughs by the way - but in that context of neglect, what is the power of the poor? And isn't it easy enough to axe a tree?

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dcmarti1
5 hours ago, badger11 said:

The poem translates a lack of progress in those coughs from ancient Citroens and Skodas - like the coughs by the way - but in that context of neglect, what is the power of the poor? And isn't it easy enough to axe a tree?

I am TRYING to have hope for the former Eastern bloc.

The power of the poor is in numbers, but xenophobia, bribery, sexism, ageism, etc., still run rough shod. I would have THOUGHT the Orthodox Church would have been a force for LIBERATION, since the non-collaborators were surely persecuted.

I was trying to infer that nature will outlive us all, and that maybe (surely, actually) nature does not need us at all. I am just glad to be writing ANYTHING...

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badger11

Fair enough Marti. I should state the fact the poem provoked thought is a positive.

all the best

Phil

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Tinker

Hi Marti,  I know so little about Estonia, Latvia, Bulgaria, Serbia et al.   It is only here on this forum that they have become real places to me.  You, Tony and Phil seem to connect to that part of the world and I get to share glimpses through your poetry.   I'm always fascinated when you write poetry opening the door a little wider.   This was no exception.

This recurring refrain spoke to me.  Who knew?   I had to Google.   Never before heard of Plovdiv.  

On ‎6‎/‎9‎/‎2019 at 7:25 PM, dcmarti1 said:

one street over
In Europe's oldest city:

Work clothes, crusty bread and French press coffee set a scene of life simply moving slowly forward but with old roots deep in the soil of a very old city.   Yet the old tree is still there growing.    The images tell the story.    I loved the feel of the poem and the refrain and repetition made it easy to picture.   I'm really glad you are writing again and sharing it here.

~~Tink


~~ © ~~ Poems by Judi Van Gorder ~~

For permission to use this work you can write to Tinker1111@icloud.com

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dcmarti1
10 hours ago, Tinker said:

Hi Marti,  I know so little about Estonia, Latvia, Bulgaria, Serbia et al.   It is only here on this forum that they have become real places to me.  You, Tony and Phil seem to connect to that part of the world and I get to share glimpses through your poetry.   I'm always fascinated when you write poetry opening the door a little wider.   This was no exception.

This recurring refrain spoke to me.  Who knew?   I had to Google.   Never before heard of Plovdiv.  

Work clothes, crusty bread and French press coffee set a scene of life simply moving slowly forward but with old roots deep in the soil of a very old city.   Yet the old tree is still there growing.    The images tell the story.    I loved the feel of the poem and the refrain and repetition made it easy to picture.   I'm really glad you are writing again and sharing it here.

~~Tink

But my knowledge is of the broadest measure, nothing really deeply substantive. I am a Socialist, but that tyrant Putin needs to be stopped. I knew he was trouble in 2000 when he let that Russian navy sub sink after getting international offers for help. These right-wing reactionaries are making inroads into the former Soviet satellite states. Let's hope their NATO membership softens their reactionary fantasies. Hope, indeed.

Thanks, as always, for reading and encouraging.

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dcmarti1
On 6/11/2019 at 12:16 AM, badger11 said:

Fair enough Marti. I should state the fact the poem provoked thought is a positive.

all the best

Phil

I enjoy provoking you. Muah! Take care.  ;)

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badger11

I agree Marti. Parallels can be drawn from the era of Hitler, Stalin and Mussolini with today's political leaders. Putin, Trump, Xi Jinping, Assad,  Erdoğan...dictators, gangsters and demagogues. The latter appeal to that 'power of the people' through nationalism and xenophobia. After all, Hitler was initially an elected politician! 

cheers

phil

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dcmarti1
18 hours ago, badger11 said:

I agree Marti. Parallels can be drawn from the era of Hitler, Stalin and Mussolini with today's political leaders. Putin, Trump, Xi Jinping, Assad,  Erdoğan...dictators, gangsters and demagogues. The latter appeal to that 'power of the people' through nationalism and xenophobia. After all, Hitler was initially an elected politician! 

cheers

phil

Orban, Babis, and possibly Johnson. What has happened?

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David W. Parsley

Well selected details and nice use of refrain make the mundane a compelling backdrop to the political unrest.  Combined with the age of the city and of a single living tree, it shows that the earth and all that is in it will continue.  And what a title to go with that tree!

Nice!

 - Dave

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tonyv

I do like the mood in this poem, Marti. Lyrical pieces are my favorites. This one is short (as I like them), and it employs some pleasing poetic devices (e.g. the repetition/refrain).

I, too, like the mention of the crusty bread and coffee, but stanza three's "deep Summer night" is what appeals to me the most. I can see, feel, sense the blackness and imagine the white buildings against its backdrop.1

The last stanza has a hopefulness to it. Doesn't it say somewhere in the Bible that all of mankind's institutions will be toppled?

Tony

1. 

1453079723887_570271.jpeg


Here is a link to an index of my works on this site: tonyv's Member Archive topic

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