Jump to content
Poetry Magnum Opus

Out of a wooden world


Benjamin
 Share

Recommended Posts

Out of a wooden world of long benched halls

and horns of mead. Rise garnets of blood red

from India; the finest Byzantine

silver, and beads of blue Italian glass.

Their provenance imparts a truth, with dark

niello accents etched on Frankish gold.

Where eye is teased, bewildered, held in thrall.

Fantastic creatures, abstract, ribbon-like,

whose convolutions suddenly will end

in mean and jewelled head-- reveal themselves.

Not as a maze, or Celtic version of

a wandering Greek key-- but serpents-- Norse.

Edited by Benjamin
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My interests are wide and varied. I compiled these few lines because I understand that it is no longer politically correct to refer to the “dark ages” (after Romans left Britain 410 AD) ; but Anglo-Saxon England remains a shadowy place, with contradictory and confusing sources and archeology. Yet out of it came much that is familiar in modern Britain, including it's laws, it's parish boundaries, a language that came to dominate the world, as well as metalwork and manuscript illumination of dazzling intricacy and beauty. Benjamin

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Richly inlaid, I could visualise the craft, and I liked the thread of trade with the mention of exotic places (no doubt some plunder too). 'niello' was a wonderful discovery. Not sure about the from dangling on L2.

 

badge

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Out of a wooden world of long benched halls

and horns of mead. Rise garnets of blood red

from India; the finest Byzantine

silver, and beads of blue Italian glass.

Their provenance imparts a truth, with dark

niello accents etched on Frankish gold.

Where eye is teased, bewildered, held in thrall.

Fantastic creatures, abstract, ribbon-like,

whose convolutions suddenly will end

in mean and jewelled head-- reveal themselves.

Not as a maze, or Celtic version of

a wandering Greek key-- but serpents-- Norse.

My interests are wide and varied. I compiled these few lines because I understand that it is no longer politically correct to refer to the “dark ages” (after Romans left Britain 410 AD) ; but Anglo-Saxon England remains a shadowy place, with contradictory and confusing sources and archeology. Yet out of it came much that is familiar in modern Britain, including it's laws, it's parish boundaries, a language that came to dominate the world, as well as metalwork and manuscript illumination of dazzling intricacy and beauty. Benjamin

 

Very, very good, Geoff. I'm amazed by the high caliber of work being posted lately. It's really inspiring.

 

From your poem and notes, I've learned more than I've known up until now on the subject. A shadowy place with a fascinating history, mostly unfamiliar to me, and you've taken me there.

 

Tony

Here is a link to an index of my works on this site: tonyv's Member Archive topic

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks Tony. The regal burial ship at Sutton Hoo (1939)and more recent finds in Staffordshire,England indicate that people of this period which we know so little about, probably had international trade links, as well as early contact with the Vikings who were renowned invaders,extensive travellers and tellers of epic tales.G.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Guidelines.