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Epistle to Ms Austen


badger11
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Dear Jane, although I do not have your mind,
A mind that makes moral choices so clear,
Clear enough now for me to right my wrongs,
The wrongs that take refuge in life's muddles,
For muddles marinate in solitude;
Yet solitude gives thought for humankind,
A humankind in which we both belong,
Belong because we live not for puzzles,
Those puzzles are a solace only for fears,
For fears will offer no solicitude.
I learn solicitude from you dear Jane.

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There is loveliness in the epistolary poem directed toward a loved one, no matter what it's tone may be. After all, isn't solicitude, in one form or another, the source of such poems? I don't detect any sarcasm in this poem, so I'll proceed from that standpoint.

"Epistle" is addressed toward one who is an important influence, possibly the most important one, in the speaker's life. It could be a parent, but that's derived from this reader's life experience. Whoever it is, the speaker is lucky to have someone like this to serve as magnetic north for his moral compass.

Ultimately, I think one always has decisions he must make and lessons he must learn on his own. Ongoing wrongs can be righted. For some wrongs, there is only forgiveness.

Very nice work. I've seen this form where words at the ends of lines are used in the beginnings of others. What is called? 

Tony

Here is a link to an index of my works on this site: tonyv's Member Archive topic

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1 hour ago, tonyv said:

I've seen this form where words at the ends of lines are used in the beginnings of others. What is called?

Tony,   The repetition of an end word at the beginning of the next line is a technique rather than a verse form it is patterned after the French Chain.

~~Judi  

 

~~ © ~~ Poems by Judi Van Gorder ~~

For permission to use this work you can write to Tinker1111@icloud.com

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Badger,  I really enjoyed reading this.  The obvious chain did create a nice rhythm but the content was what I found fascinating.  I love this line.... I was so curious to know what muddles?

14 hours ago, badger11 said:

The wrongs that take refuge in life's muddles,

This was fun to read.

~~Judi

~~ © ~~ Poems by Judi Van Gorder ~~

For permission to use this work you can write to Tinker1111@icloud.com

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Thank you Tink and Tony. This poem was my attempt at a 'quickie' write. 'Jane' relates to Jane Austen, an author who is one of my favourite writers and 'solicitude' is one of her key words.

all the best

Phil

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Well, I spoke to my mother this morning, and she's also a Jane Austin fan. Now, I have a better understanding. I do like Judi's suggestion re the title. 

Here is a link to an index of my works on this site: tonyv's Member Archive topic

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Badge,

 

Once again a piece that invokes another time in place as part of the 'universal' all time and all place. Love the word choice and I too am a fan of Austin, and once that piece was in place, loved the piece more;-)

 

Doc Con

thegateless.org Come on over and check out my poetry substack y'all;-) Or if your bored, head to the Zazzle store: https://www.zazzle.com/store/gateless. If you buy anything I lose a bet, so consider that before you violate the digital rules.

 

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Hi Badge,   I now really love it, I too am a big fan of Ms. Austen.   I think to make it clearer for dummies like me, what if you titled it Epistle to Ms. Austen.  Then is all falls together.

Thanks for coming back Tink and Tony.  And for your response Juris. The title has been changed! Pleased there are fellow Austen fans in PMO world. Do you have a particular favourite Austen novel Tink? Juris? Tony's mum?!

best

Phil

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23 minutes ago, badger11 said:

... Do you have a particular favourite Austen novel Tink? Juris? Tony's mum?!

best

Phil

I can call her any time, Phil, but my routine is to call her on Saturday mornings during coffee/breakfast, right before grocery shopping, and we usually talk for a good hour. I just had lunch, so I'll try to remember next weekend.

Tony :laugh:

Here is a link to an index of my works on this site: tonyv's Member Archive topic

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When you asked, "Emma" immediately came to mind.  I just wanted to smack her sometimes but I chuckled at the muddle she kept creating.  I've liked it for different reasons from when I was young and first read it to reading when I was more mature.   I actually related to her a bit when I was in my teens, though our upbringing was quite different.  But even then I thought, how blind can she be?

~~Tink

~~ © ~~ Poems by Judi Van Gorder ~~

For permission to use this work you can write to Tinker1111@icloud.com

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1 hour ago, Tinker said:

When you asked, "Emma" immediately came to mind.  I just wanted to smack her sometimes but I chuckled at the muddle she kept creating.  I've liked it for different reasons from when I was young and first read it to reading when I was more mature.   I actually related to her a bit when I was in my teens, though our upbringing was quite different.  But even then I thought, how blind can she be?

~~Tink

Hmmm ... and my mom said that the solicitude exhibited by characters in one of the books (Pride & Prejudice?) concerning the unmarried sister seemed to her completely normal, but she could see how possibly to a male reader, there could be something to learn! :laugh: And also, she thought it was appropriate how one of the female characters (forget which book -- again P&P maybe?) explained to the man that he should be patient and good (not disrespectful) toward his wife even though she was a silly woman whom he had married only because she was attractive!

Here is a link to an index of my works on this site: tonyv's Member Archive topic

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For the last couple of years I've been re-reading most of the Austen novels each year. My vote goes to individual characters: Elizabeth Bennet (Pride and Prejudice) for her honesty; and Elinor Dashwood (Sense and Sensibility) for her solicitude. I prefer Austen where the female is a protagonist with strength of character. Fanny Price (Mansfield Park) has solicitude, but feels passive and breaks down in tears too much!

 

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  • 1 month later...
David W. Parsley

Don't have a specific favorite, but I enjoyed your management of the chain, badge.  I should go back and read/re-read some Austen.

 - Dave

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David W. Parsley
On 9/4/2019 at 1:00 PM, badger11 said:

Thanks Dave. I'm reading Dicken's novels now. Dave Copperfield highly recommended for its characters.

best

Phil

I went through a Dickens phase several years ago, found him very rich and rewarding.  Still have several still to read such as The Pickwick Papers and Bleak House.  Modern critics seem to consider the latter to be his greatest novel.  I confess that I am still thoroughly blown away by the iconic (over-exposed, perhaps, like Beethoven's 5th) A Tale of Two Cities.  To me it is unsurpassed in the novel genre.

Cheers,
 - Dave

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